Bazas Cathedral

Bazas, France

Bazas Cathedral was the seat of the Bishop of Bazas until the French Revolution (after which it was not restored but was instead, by the Concordat of 1801, divided between the dioceses of Bordeaux, Agen and Aire) and its main attraction is still the cathedral dedicated to Saint John the Baptist, so named because the blood of John the Baptist was venerated here. The cathedral dominates the town and stands at the east end of a wide, open space called the parvis.

The cathedral dates mainly from the 13th-14th centuries, and was built on the model of the great Gothic cathedrals of northern France. The west front is unique with its three noticeable levels: the first includes the three Gothic portals retaining part of their original 13th-century sculpture; the second includes the rose window from 1537; and the third is a Neoclassical gable from 1723. The belfry on the north is part 11th century up to the openings.

The interior consists of a long, narrow nave, with no transept, and was entirely rebuilt from 1583-1635 after the Huguenots badly damaged it in 1561 during the Wars of Religion.

The cathedral is part of the World Heritage Sites of the Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

airmax RD (6 months ago)
It's free to access and the place is beautiful
Andrew Ding (6 months ago)
Worth a visit
paul (9 months ago)
Bg
Philippe Barbe (2 years ago)
Marvelous Cathedral in the middle of a very old square
Kelcey Turnbull (3 years ago)
This was a stop on the Compostela pilgrimage route so that's pretty cool! This place is just gorgeous and quite the centerpiece to a beautiful town!
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