Monolithic Church of Saint-Emilion

Saint-Émilion, France

The Monolithic Church of Saint-Emilion is an underground church dugged in the early 12th century of gigantic proportions (38 metres long and 12 metres high). At the heart of the city, the church reminds the religious activity of the city in the Middle Ages and intrigues by its unusual design. If it shows itself in the eyes of the visitor by the position of a 68-meter-high bell tower, then it hides itself behind the elegance of three openings on the front and a Gothic portal often closed.

The goal of its realization is probably the development of the city around a pilgrim activity on the tomb of the patron saint St. Emilion. In memory of the Breton hermit who had settled in a nearby cave during the 8th century, and in order to edify the faithful, the ambition to achieve a sufficiently large reliquary church to host hundreds of pilgrims, was born.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Duh (4 months ago)
Wonderful place explained by a good guide.
Brandon Miller (5 months ago)
Incredible to think the church was carved out of stone. It's HUGE!
Sven Kado (14 months ago)
worth a visit! Uniquely built into the rock.
Luca Sala (14 months ago)
Saint Emilion it'magic itself and the Monolithic Church is simply unique!
K Koh (17 months ago)
Unique underground church and very interesting tour.
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