Château La Louvière

Léognan, France

Château La Louvière is a Bordeaux wine producer from the Pessac-Léognan appellation of Bordeaux. The first small vineyard on the estate was planted in 1476, in a location named La Lobeyra, on land owned by the Guilloche family since 1398. During the period from 1510 to 1550 many land plots were acquired by Pierre de Guilloche and his son Jean de Guilloche. Lady Roquetaillade, the heiress to the Guilloche family, sold La Louvière in 1618 to Arnaud de Gascq, abbot of the Abbey of Saint-Ferme. He donated it in 1620 to Notre Dame de Miséricorde, a Carthusian Order in Bordeaux. At this stage the property was in a poor state, but was restored by the monks. Under the monks' management, both red and white wines were produced during the early parts of the 17th century, and shipped to customers in Picardy, England and Flanders.

In November 1789, following the French Revolution, the Assemblée Nationale confiscated all church property, which included the Carthusian-owned La Louvière. Following the confiscation, it was auctioned off to the Bordeaux wine merchant Jean-Baptiste Mareilhac in 1791. Marheilhac also built a modern château building on the estate. The château, designed by François Lhote, is a listed historical monument since 1991.

The Mareilhac family continued as owners for most part of the 19th century. From 1911 to 1944, La Louvière was run by Alfred Bertrand-Taquet, who was also mayor of Léognan from 1919 until the start of Second World War. After the war, it had absentee landlords and was neglected for a long period. In 1965, it was purchased by André Lurton, who embarked on restoration of both the château and of the vineyards.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

brian maran (3 months ago)
Nice visit to this mythical castle Visit by appointment only, very fun, we were alone, feeling privileged ... A very nice experience, thank you for your welcome ... Time for tasting now ?
Ben (5 months ago)
Very good, very beautiful. Exorbitant the price of a bike ride, 1300 € for a group of 20 people 3 hours of cycling and 2 tasting glasses, no commercial gesture. Thank you
Marion Borget (5 months ago)
We had a very pleasant time with the family. The wine course allowed us to learn a lot of things. Great atmosphere and setting!
Eduardo Silva (2 years ago)
Incredible fabulous place with very good wines and environment.
Vito Luis (4 years ago)
Beautiful property and Pauline was an excellent and knowledgable host! I would like to come back
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