Quarr Abbey is a monastery between the villages of Binstead and Fishbourne on the Isle of Wight in southern England. The Grade I listed monastic buildings and church, completed in 1912, are considered some of the most important twentieth-century religious structures in the United Kingdom. They were constructed from Belgian brick in a style combining French, Byzantine and Moorish architectural elements. In the vicinity are a few remains of the original twelfth-century abbey.

History

St. Mary's Abbey at Quarr was part of the Cistercian Order and was founded in 1132 by Baldwin de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon, fourth Lord of the Isle of Wight. The founder was buried in the Abbey in 1155, and his remains, along with those of a royal princess, Cecily of York (died 1507), second daughter of King Edward IV of England and godmother of Henry VIII, still lie on the site of the mediaeval monastery, as do other important personages. Arreton Manor was part of the abbey from the 12th century until 1525.

The name Quarr comes from 'quarry', because there used to be a stone quarry in the neighbourhood. The original title of the monastery was the Abbey of Our Lady and St John. Stone from the quarry was used in the Middle Ages for both ecclesiastical and military buildings, for example for parts of the Tower of London.

This site became a valuable and productive property. Because of this, it was the tradition for the abbot to be appointed warden or lord of the island. The prevalence of piracy in the area led to the granting in 1340 of special permission to fortify the area against attack. A stone wall, sea gate and portcullis were constructed. The ruins of these defences are still visible.

After the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536, the land was acquired by a Southampton merchant, George Mills who demolished most of the abbey. Its stone was used for fortifications at the nearby towns of Cowes and Yarmouth.

One of the three abbey bells is preserved in the belfry of the nearby Anglican parish church, originally built by the monks of Quarr Abbey for their lay dependants. Salvaged stone was also used to build Quarr Abbey House.

Modern abbey

The first monks arrived at Quarr Abbey House from Appuldurcombe on 25 June 1907 to prepare the grounds and the beginnings of a kitchen garden. They also put up fencing around the property, established a chicken farm and planted an orchard.

One of the monks, Dom Paul Bellot, aged 31, was an architect. He designed and draughted plans for the new abbey, incorporating and extending Quarr Abbey House, some distance from the ruins of the medieval monastery. 300 workers from the Isle of Wight, accustomed to building only dwelling-houses, raised a building whose design and workmanship is admired by all who visit the Abbey. The building of the refectory and three sides of the cloister began in 1907 and was completed inside one year. The rest of the monks came from Appuldurcombe and, in April 1911, work began on the Abbey church which was quickly completed and consecrated on 12 October 1912. It was built with tall pointed towers of glowing Flemish brick, adding a touch of Byzantium to the skyline. The monastic buildings are considered some of the most important twentieth-century religious structures in the United Kingdom.

In 1922, after World War I, the community of Solesmes returned to France. A small community of monks was left at Quarr which, from being a priory of Solesmes, became in 1937 an independent abbey, with English monks recruited to the community.

With a shrinking community and ageing buildings the World Monuments Fund identified Quarr Abbey as one of the 100 most endangered historic sites in the world. In July 2012 the Heritage Lottery Fund awarded Quarr a £1.9 million matching grant. The project included repair and conservation of the abbey remains and existing abbey church, as well as a visitor information centre and education and training placements in construction for local college students. In the Bellot Abbey, repairs were carried out to remedy rain penetration.

A community of fewer than a dozen monks maintains the monastery's regular life and the attached farm.

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Address

Quarr Road, Ryde, United Kingdom
See all sites in Ryde

Details

Founded: 1132/1912
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Diane “Snapper 63” Smith (14 months ago)
Lovely place to visit. Very pretty grounds. Outdoor tea garden and farm animals. The abbey itself is stunning. Great setting to spend an hour or two.
Christopher Townsend (15 months ago)
I've visited the abbey twice now, and each time it's been a real effort to leave it's lovely atmosphere. There is a very special feeling to the place , a serenity that only a living and thriving spiritual community can provide. I find comfort in the fact that a place like Quarr Abbey exists in an increasingly fractious and divisive world. Plus a bookshop that would take a lifetime to exhaust , there are so many excellent reads in it.
Dave Woodcock (16 months ago)
Beautiful peaceful place, after the many on the ferry,a robin sitting on a pram handle looking at the baby while I checked out the chocolate cake... piglet's with their mum's running around separate page pens,mud pools to cool their skin and protect against sun..calm place for prayer in the Abbey.red squirrel live near,but elusive........
Rob Wood (16 months ago)
A beautiful abbey, although limited amount that can be accessed - unsurprising as it is a working abbey and retreat. It is quite austere inside, but we were lucky enough to catch a session of worship and enjoyed some plainsong from the monks. There is a decent café, a shop, and you can wander around the animal pens - there were some very cute piglets!
Alison Gandy (17 months ago)
Oh how nice to wonder in the fresh air and to see the pigs. Bought pig food and spent time with the pigs and piglets-very cute. Still have some food left over for our next visit. Shop sells local produce, reasonable priced, really worth a visit.
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