Château de Langeais

Langeais, France

The Château de Langeais is a medieval castle, rebuilt as a château. Founded in 992 by Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou, the castle was soon attacked by Odo I, Count of Blois. After the unsuccessful attack, the now-ruined stone keep was built; it is one of the earliest datable stone examples of a keep. Between 994 and 996 the castle was besieged unsuccessfully twice more. During the conflict between the counts of Anjou and Blois, the castle changed hands several times, and in 1038 Fulk captured the castle again.

Under the Plantagenet kings, the château was fortified and expanded by Richard I of England (King Richard the Lionhearted). However, King Philippe II of France recaptured the château in 1206. Eventually though, during the Hundred Years' War, the English destroyed it. The château was rebuilt about 1465 during the reign of King Louis XI. The great hall of the château was the scene of the marriage of Anne of Brittany to King Charles VIII on December 6, 1491 that made the permanent union of Brittany and France.

In 1886, Jacques Siegfried bought Château Langeais and began a restoration program. He installed an outstanding collection of tapestries and furnishings and bequeathed the château to the Institut de France which still owns it today. Today Langeais is especially noted for its monumental and highly decorated chimneypieces. t is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture and is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1465
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Trucker Evliya Gökçebey (10 months ago)
I think ıts perfect
Charu Shikha (12 months ago)
The castle is so beautiful. There is a bird show which is so good. You can take a tour of the castle with the bird show.
Charu Shikha (12 months ago)
The castle is so beautiful. There is a bird show which is so good. You can take a tour of the castle with the bird show.
Heloise King (12 months ago)
Beautiful castle.
yaca Madec (12 months ago)
A place to go: 2 hours for a very interesting and different insight of French history. Family friendly with the gardens and an amazing tree house.
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