Joan of Arc's House

Orléans, France

Joan of Arc, also known as Jeanne d'Arc, (1412-1431) was a national heroine of France and is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. She asserted that she had visions from God which told her to recover her homeland from English domination late in the Hundred Years' War. Also known as the Maid of Orléans, she (according a legend) liberated city of Orléans from the siege of English in 1429.

Today there is a small museum dedicated to Orléans's favorite mademoiselle. The house is a 20th century reproduction of the half-timbered 15th century house where Joan of Arc stayed during her heroics. The original house was much modified, but then destroyed by bombing in 1940. The first floor has temporary exhibitions, and the second and third floors contain Joan-related models and memorabilia.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details


Category: Museums in France

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maurille Adjibi (18 months ago)
Was good to learn more about her history through a movie
Gregory Benjamin (2 years ago)
Not alot in there. Building is a reconstruction.but the ticket gets you into a few other places as well
David Mau (2 years ago)
There is one room where you can see a movie about the history of jeanne d’arc. The movie was informative but it would have been nice to visit the whole house or at least have something else to see.
João Francisco Ferreira de Almeida (2 years ago)
I love her history. Unfortunately didn’t had the chance to step in the house.
Aaron Hantsche (2 years ago)
Inside is a 15 minute movie about Joan of Arc. Can read the story in English or French in the anteroom. Would recommend to any history lovers interested in a short stop!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Soave Castle

Soave castle was built in 934 to protect the area against the Hungarian invasions. It was remodelled by Cansignorio of the Scaliger family in the mid-1300s. in 1365 Cansignorio had the town walls erected and the Town hall was built in the same year.

The castle underwent various vicissitudes until, having lost its strategic importance, it was sold on the private market in 1596. In 1830 it was inherited by Giulio Camuzzoni who restored the manor and in particular the surroundings walls (with is twenty-four towers), the battlements and living-quarters.

Soave castle is a typical medieval military edifice, commanding the neighbourhood of the city from the Tenda Hill. It comprises a mastio (donjon) and three lines of walls forming three courts of different size. The outer line, with a gate and a draw bridge, is the most recent, built by the Venetians in the 15th century. It houses the remains of a small church from the 10th century.

The second and larger court, the first of the original castle, is called della Madonna for a fresco portraying St. Mary (1321). Another fresco is visible after the door leading to the inner court, and portrays a Scaliger soldier. The mastio is the most impressive feature of the castle. Bones found within showed it was used also as prison and place of torture.

The House called del Capitano (the Scaliger commander) houses Roman coins, weapons parts, medals and other ancient remains found during the most recent restoration. Adjacent is a bedroom with a 13th-century fresco with St. Mary and Madeleine and a dining room with medieval kitchenware. Another room houses the portraits of the most famous Scaliger figures: Mastino I, Cangrande, Cansignorio and Taddea da Carrara, wife of Mastino II; the portrait of Dante Alighieri testify an alleged sojourn of the poet in the castle.