Joan of Arc's House

Orléans, France

Joan of Arc, also known as Jeanne d'Arc, (1412-1431) was a national heroine of France and is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. She asserted that she had visions from God which told her to recover her homeland from English domination late in the Hundred Years' War. Also known as the Maid of Orléans, she (according a legend) liberated city of Orléans from the siege of English in 1429.

Today there is a small museum dedicated to Orléans's favorite mademoiselle. The house is a 20th century reproduction of the half-timbered 15th century house where Joan of Arc stayed during her heroics. The original house was much modified, but then destroyed by bombing in 1940. The first floor has temporary exhibitions, and the second and third floors contain Joan-related models and memorabilia.

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Category: Museums in France

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maurille Adjibi (20 months ago)
Was good to learn more about her history through a movie
Gregory Benjamin (2 years ago)
Not alot in there. Building is a reconstruction.but the ticket gets you into a few other places as well
David Mau (2 years ago)
There is one room where you can see a movie about the history of jeanne d’arc. The movie was informative but it would have been nice to visit the whole house or at least have something else to see.
João Francisco Ferreira de Almeida (2 years ago)
I love her history. Unfortunately didn’t had the chance to step in the house.
Aaron Hantsche (2 years ago)
Inside is a 15 minute movie about Joan of Arc. Can read the story in English or French in the anteroom. Would recommend to any history lovers interested in a short stop!
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