Joan of Arc's House

Orléans, France

Joan of Arc, also known as Jeanne d'Arc, (1412-1431) was a national heroine of France and is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. She asserted that she had visions from God which told her to recover her homeland from English domination late in the Hundred Years' War. Also known as the Maid of Orléans, she (according a legend) liberated city of Orléans from the siege of English in 1429.

Today there is a small museum dedicated to Orléans's favorite mademoiselle. The house is a 20th century reproduction of the half-timbered 15th century house where Joan of Arc stayed during her heroics. The original house was much modified, but then destroyed by bombing in 1940. The first floor has temporary exhibitions, and the second and third floors contain Joan-related models and memorabilia.

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Category: Museums in France

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3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Keith Cromer (7 months ago)
Awesome displays and information. Really enjoyed my visit. Staff was extremely polite and informative.
Priyadharshni RAMANUJAM (11 months ago)
It's best if we start here first. It's a short story about the history of Joan of Arc. I saw the short film in English but it's available in others too.
Priyadharshni RAMANUJAM (11 months ago)
It's best if we start here first. It's a short story about the history of Joan of Arc. I saw the short film in English but it's available in others too.
Leah Davis (12 months ago)
We were only able to watch the short film on the main floor, which was quite underwhelming. The entire upstairs is roped off, and if we had known that, we would not have wasted our time.
Leah Davis (12 months ago)
We were only able to watch the short film on the main floor, which was quite underwhelming. The entire upstairs is roped off, and if we had known that, we would not have wasted our time.
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