Orléans Historical and Archaeological Museum

Orléans, France

In one of the most beautiful Renaissance buildings in the city of Orléans is the Musée historique et archéologique de l'Orléanais. As is to be expected of a regional museum much of what is on display is the history of the Orléans area. Undoubtedly, the most spectacular feature is an exhibition of Gallic and Roman bronzes. The collection consists of 30 bronze objects. They were found in the Neuvy-en-Sullias commune about 30kms from Orlèans. In 1861 the objects were found quite fortuitously by workmen in a sand quarry, but the exact circumstances of their recovery are unclear. The hoard includes various animal, human and mythological figures.

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Category: Museums in France

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrianne Kingh (2 years ago)
P pop pppppoppppp pop ppiipopp0 pop pppp pop
Binene Horchani (2 years ago)
Amazing !
martin whipp (2 years ago)
Very nice Joan of arc exhibition. Main museum was also fascinating in a very interesting building on multiple floors.
Victorique de Blois (3 years ago)
I understand much had been destroyed during the war, but the collection is still too few for such an important city in French history…
Arthur Livesley (4 years ago)
Unfortunately partially closed when I was there, due to restoration work
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