Pointe des Corbeaux Lighthouse

Île d'Yeu, France

The Pointe des Corbeaux lighthouse was constructed in 1950 to replace an earlier tower destroyed during World War II. Along with the Île d'Yeu lighthouse, it is one of two lighthouses on the island to have been designed by Maurice Durand; construction of both was completed in the same year.

The first lighthouse on the point was lit on September 1, 1862. A small tourelle encased in masonry, it stood 38 feet tall, and was based on plans provided by the state. Its life was very uneventful; it was converted to different sorts of power on numerous occasions, at various times running on vegetable and mineral oil and gas vapor. This lighthouse lasted until being destroyed by retreating German troops on August 25, 1944. Reconstruction of the tower was completed in 1950 to Durand's design. This lighthouse was automated in 1990, and remains an active aid to navigation; it currently shows a halogen-powered signal.

The Pointe des Corbeaux lighthouse is 62 feet tall, and is an octagonal concrete structure with lantern and gallery; attached is a one-storey keeper's dwelling. The tower and gallery are white, while the lantern is red. The lighthouse shows a series of three red flashes, in a two-one pattern, every fifteen seconds. Attached to the tower is a keeper's dwelling, which with several other annexes completes the station.

Today the lighthouse is controlled from the station at the Île d'Yeu lighthouse; it can be seen both from land and from water, but cannot be visited by the public. Another, smaller aid to navigation, a post light attached to a short stone base, is also located on the point.

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    Details

    Founded: 1950
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    en.wikipedia.org

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    User Reviews

    AFK_Stadler918 TV (2 years ago)
    Magnifique phare, mon arriere grand pere a contribué à sa reconstruction, et j'en suis fier :-) Visite payante (2 ou 5€) je ne sais plus!
    Jérôme Tenaille (2 years ago)
    Au bout du bout de l'île, un phare blanc à la lumière rouge planté sur la côte sauvage à quelques mètres des étendues de plages, et au milieu quelques baraques de pécheurs. Un endroit merveilleux hors du temps.
    Rousseau Daniel (2 years ago)
    Le beau temps, le soleil,la plage,les dauphins et le continent en fond magique
    Arianna Avanzini (2 years ago)
    Stunning! Breathtaking. Best place to propose ☺️
    Tchubby Thésard (2 years ago)
    Belle balade surtout pour un Enlighten, mais phare privé pas de possibilité de visite. Plages des Corbeaux avec jolie vue à 100 m.
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