Pointe des Corbeaux Lighthouse

Île d'Yeu, France

The Pointe des Corbeaux lighthouse was constructed in 1950 to replace an earlier tower destroyed during World War II. Along with the Île d'Yeu lighthouse, it is one of two lighthouses on the island to have been designed by Maurice Durand; construction of both was completed in the same year.

The first lighthouse on the point was lit on September 1, 1862. A small tourelle encased in masonry, it stood 38 feet tall, and was based on plans provided by the state. Its life was very uneventful; it was converted to different sorts of power on numerous occasions, at various times running on vegetable and mineral oil and gas vapor. This lighthouse lasted until being destroyed by retreating German troops on August 25, 1944. Reconstruction of the tower was completed in 1950 to Durand's design. This lighthouse was automated in 1990, and remains an active aid to navigation; it currently shows a halogen-powered signal.

The Pointe des Corbeaux lighthouse is 62 feet tall, and is an octagonal concrete structure with lantern and gallery; attached is a one-storey keeper's dwelling. The tower and gallery are white, while the lantern is red. The lighthouse shows a series of three red flashes, in a two-one pattern, every fifteen seconds. Attached to the tower is a keeper's dwelling, which with several other annexes completes the station.

Today the lighthouse is controlled from the station at the Île d'Yeu lighthouse; it can be seen both from land and from water, but cannot be visited by the public. Another, smaller aid to navigation, a post light attached to a short stone base, is also located on the point.

References:

    Comments

    Your name

    Website (optional)



    Details

    Founded: 1950
    Category:

    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    AFK_Stadler918 TV (11 months ago)
    Magnifique phare, mon arriere grand pere a contribué à sa reconstruction, et j'en suis fier :-) Visite payante (2 ou 5€) je ne sais plus!
    Jérôme Tenaille (11 months ago)
    Au bout du bout de l'île, un phare blanc à la lumière rouge planté sur la côte sauvage à quelques mètres des étendues de plages, et au milieu quelques baraques de pécheurs. Un endroit merveilleux hors du temps.
    Rousseau Daniel (12 months ago)
    Le beau temps, le soleil,la plage,les dauphins et le continent en fond magique
    Arianna Avanzini (13 months ago)
    Stunning! Breathtaking. Best place to propose ☺️
    Tchubby Thésard (14 months ago)
    Belle balade surtout pour un Enlighten, mais phare privé pas de possibilité de visite. Plages des Corbeaux avec jolie vue à 100 m.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Château de Chaumont

    The Château de Chaumont was founded in the 10th century by Odo I, Count of Blois. The purpose was to protect his lands from attacks from his feudal rivals, Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou. On his behalf the Norman Gelduin received it, improved it and held it as his own. His great-niece Denise de Fougère, having married Sulpice d'Amboise, passed the château into the Amboise family for five centuries.

    Pierre d'Amboise unsuccessfully rebelled against King Louis XI and his property was confiscated, and the castle was dismantled on royal order in 1465. It was later rebuilt by Charles I d'Amboise from 1465–1475 and then finished by his son, Charles II d'Amboise de Chaumont from 1498–1510, with help from his uncle, Cardinal Georges d'Amboise; some Renaissance features were to be seen in buildings that retained their overall medieval appearance. The château was acquired by Catherine de Medici in 1550. There she entertained numerous astrologers, among them Nostradamus. When her husband, Henry II, died in 1559 she forced his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, to exchange Château de Chaumont for Château de Chenonceau which Henry had given to de Poitiers. Diane de Poitiers only lived at Chaumont for a short while.

    Later Chaumont has changed hands several times. Paul de Beauvilliers bought the château in 1699, modernized some of its interiors and decorated it with sufficient grandeur to house the duc d'Anjou on his way to become king of Spain in 1700. Monsieur Bertin demolished the north wing to open the house towards the river view in the modern fashion.

    In 1750, Jacques-Donatien Le Ray purchased the castle as a country home where he established a glassmaking and pottery factory. He was considered the French "Father of the American Revolution" because he loved America. However, in 1789, the new French Revolutionary Government seized Le Ray's assets, including his beloved Château de Chaumont.

    The castle has been classified as a Monument historique since 1840 by the French Ministry of Culture. The Château de Chaumont is currently a museum and every year hosts a Garden Festival from April to October where contemporary garden designers display their work in an English-style garden.