Lielstraupe Castle

Straupe, Latvia

Lielstraupe Castle was built at the end of the 13th century by Fabian von Rosen, vassal of the Riga Archbishop. The village of Straupe began to develop around the castle in the 14th century. A large tower was added around 1600. Severely damaged by fire in 1905, the castle was restored between 1906 and 1909 by architect Vilhelms Bokslafs. Since 1963 it has housed a drug addiction rehabilitation hospital.

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Address

E264, Straupe, Latvia
See all sites in Straupe

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lady N (2 months ago)
Medieval manor with historical spirit. Near the church was located the cemetry of Rosen family. The huge stone plates saves the history about 19s century burials.
Arnis Lusins (4 months ago)
Vienīgā tik autentiski saglabājusies pils Baltijā, Hanzas pilsētu savienības dalībniece. Straupe - mazākā Hanzas pilsēta - visā tagad atjaunotajā Hanzas pilsētu savienībā. No Zviedrijas kāda arheoloģijas profesore bija atbraukusi un teica, ka tik unikālu pili ar tādu vēsturi un neapbūvētu apkārtni citur Eiropā neatrast.
Ieva Mikosa (5 months ago)
Valsts SIA "Straupes narkoloģiskā slimnīca" izvietota Lielstraupes pils ēkā. 13.gs. celta bīskapa vasaļa pils, plānojumā neregulāra ar dzīvojamo korpusu pie rietumu sienas, kuru pārvalda Rozenu dzimta līdz 1625.g. 17.gs.1.pusē pilij bieži mainījās īpašnieki.  Blakus pilij pakāpeniski izveidojās pilsēta, kas minēta jau 1325. g. 16.gs.b.-17.gs. pilij uzcelts lielais tornis.
Iggy (5 months ago)
There is a hospital inside. Only self guided tour around the castle us available. Takes 10 - 15 min.
Ervīna Video Blogs (2 years ago)
Wonderful castle. Only one in Latvia that has a church within the castle, very unique.
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