Aglona Basilica

Aglona, Latvia

At the end of the 17th century, the Dominican Order established a monastery in Aglona and built the first wooden church. After the church burnt down in 1699, a stone monastery building and the present church were built in its place in 1768-1780. The interior of the shrine was created in the 18th-19th century, but the pulpit, the organ, and the confessional were built at the end of the 18th century.

The church houses an extensive collection of paintings, sculptures, and artistic treasures, including the famous icon “Our Miraculous Lady of Aglona”, which is uncovered only during religious festivals. The painting is considered to have healing powers. In 1993, Pope John Paul II visited Aglona sanctuary. Extensive renovation works in the church and improvements of the surrounding amenities were carried out prior to this visit.

Every year on the 15th of August, pilgrims congregate in Aglona to mark the day of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary into Heaven.

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Address

Krāslavas iela, Aglona, Latvia
See all sites in Aglona

Details

Founded: 1768-1780
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

arturs krastins (2 years ago)
Nice place to look and get very good experience and clean your soul.
Eva Kivleniece (2 years ago)
Basilica was lovely however at the little shop.could do with a warning that can't pay with cards and toilets could do with an update.
Sigitas Brazinskas (3 years ago)
Majestic church in white, what a great and impressive view in a large space and surrounded by lakes. Aglona is undiscovered town with so much to be seen and discovered. A monument of the first and the single king of Lithuania Mindaugas and his wife queen Morta was open near the basilica.
tezeusz atenski (3 years ago)
mystic space
tezeusz atenski (3 years ago)
mystic space
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