Gene Fornby is a reconstructed Iron Age settlement. The earliest traces of human activity found in the area date back to the Nordic Bronze Age, but the settlement itself dated back to the Roman Iron Age, from around the years 400-600 AD. The settlement was located just by the waterline of that time, but due to the post-glacial rebound in the area, the waterline is now about 500 meters away from the settlement.

Historically it was known that there were burial mounds on top of Genesmon, but it was not until the 1960s that they were investigated for the first time by the archaeologist Evert Baudou. Graves believed to be those of chieftains from the years 100-600 AD have been found. Gene Fornby was laid bare during archaeological excavations conducted by the University of Umeå from 1977 and 1988. The excavation revealed various buildings including a forge, believed to have been one of the largest forge in prehistoric Scandinavia. Traces of iron production and processing were uncovered as well as bronze casting and a textile works.

In 1991, work began on reconstructing the farm on Genesmon. A principal feature is the reconstructed longhouse. The facility opened in 1991 and became a popular tourist attraction during the summer months. All the houses are open to the public. The facility is operated by the Örnsköldsvik Museum & Art Gallery.

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Address

Genesmon 110, Domsjö, Sweden
See all sites in Domsjö

Details

Founded: 400-600 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Migration Period (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aliksander Gebrezgi (2 years ago)
Jåg vill ha set foto
Sofie Ödling (2 years ago)
Värt ett besök om du deltar på en guidad visning!
Ann Lindström (2 years ago)
Intressant plats, bra guider
Mia Dorn (2 years ago)
Jättemysigt ställe men vad inte verksamt när vi var där.
Feelhome B Production (4 years ago)
It´s a nice place where you can take a look howe people lived long time ago.
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