Gene Fornby is a reconstructed Iron Age settlement. The earliest traces of human activity found in the area date back to the Nordic Bronze Age, but the settlement itself dated back to the Roman Iron Age, from around the years 400-600 AD. The settlement was located just by the waterline of that time, but due to the post-glacial rebound in the area, the waterline is now about 500 meters away from the settlement.

Historically it was known that there were burial mounds on top of Genesmon, but it was not until the 1960s that they were investigated for the first time by the archaeologist Evert Baudou. Graves believed to be those of chieftains from the years 100-600 AD have been found. Gene Fornby was laid bare during archaeological excavations conducted by the University of Umeå from 1977 and 1988. The excavation revealed various buildings including a forge, believed to have been one of the largest forge in prehistoric Scandinavia. Traces of iron production and processing were uncovered as well as bronze casting and a textile works.

In 1991, work began on reconstructing the farm on Genesmon. A principal feature is the reconstructed longhouse. The facility opened in 1991 and became a popular tourist attraction during the summer months. All the houses are open to the public. The facility is operated by the Örnsköldsvik Museum & Art Gallery.

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Address

Genesmon 110, Domsjö, Sweden
See all sites in Domsjö

Details

Founded: 400-600 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Migration Period (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emil Sandström (8 months ago)
We rented the party room to celebrate a friend who turned 30. It was a good room for about 20 people. Fun medieval style on the premises which is right next to a good area for activities and swimming.
Elisabeth Nordenberg (9 months ago)
What an amazing place we came across in the woods! So interesting to see and how they have created these houses! Well worth a visit!
Sandra Andersson (10 months ago)
The beach is nothing to cheer for. The beach is full of old reeds at the beginning as well as some mud first meters. But if you come out a bit it is just fine sandy bottom, very shallow so it is very warm in the water. So swimming is really good. But generally cared for beach. The bench is falling apart and a lot of weeds. Too bad, this beach was so nice when I was a kid.
Paul Mallon (2 years ago)
This is totally worth a look, but if you go during the summer when the guides are offering free tours you will be amazed. We learned so much from them, about life on the farm, and in general during that time period. Those guides have so much knowledge to share, and do it in way that keeps kids interested. This was one of my favourite parts of out holiday, and it was free! I found it totally captivating! Definitely worth checking out.
Aliksander Gebrezgi (3 years ago)
Jåg vill ha set foto
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