Dynge Castle Ruins

Uddevalla, Sweden

Dynge Castle, also Dyngehus as it was once called, was a Norwegian fortified castle in use from approximately 1250 and onwards towards the beginning of the 16th century, when it burnt down. Located in central Bohuslän, since then passed into Swedish possession, the castle was mentioned several times in Norwegian records. The site was excavated 1912-1913 by Wilhelm Berg, who had also excavated the contemporary and largely similar castle Ragnhildsholmen Castle during the 1880s, and Olsborg Castle. Since then, the site has had no closer examination by archaeologists.

The castle was in shape similar to a motte-and-bailey, with a stone keep surrounded by a small moat, standing on top of a cliff overlooking Gullmarsfjorden. The foundations of the central keep's walls remain clearly visible, as does the moat. It is one of few remaining medieval structures in Uddevalla Municipality, alongside Dragsmark Abbey and Bokenäs Old Church.

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Details

Founded: 1250
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lena Wassenius (16 months ago)
Exciting history of the place
sven karlsson (22 months ago)
Very beautiful and good fishing.
Mahmoud Debsi (2 years ago)
??
Andreas Buchmeier (3 years ago)
Really beautiful.
Thomas Lysell (4 years ago)
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