Torpa stenhus is a well preserved medieval castle near Åsunden. The first stone house was built around 1470 by Privy Council Arvid Knutsson as fortress against the Danes. Reconstruction and remodeling took during the 1500s and 1600s. In the late 1500s the castle was enlarged and modernized: the 4th floor was added, the tower was erected and halls were decorated with beautiful paintings. The castle has still today a well-preserved Renaissance interior. The castle is best known in history as the manor of the Swedish noble family of Stenbock. It was the residence of Catherine Stenbock, third and last consort of King Gustaf Vasa.

The first half of 17th century was a heyday of Torpa Stenhus. Gustav Otto Stenbock built a new wooden manor house adjacent to the stone castle, which was used for representative events. The baroque style chapel was also built and decorated in the late 1699.

Later Torpa has been owned by Sjöblad and Sparre families. Today it hosts a hotel, restaurant and conference center.

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Address

Torpa 2, Länghem, Sweden
See all sites in Länghem

Details

Founded: 1470
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andreea Galetschi (15 months ago)
Surprisingly beautiful. Very well kept. It tells a story.
Lori S (15 months ago)
What a beautiful setting for a cool, historic castle. We got a great tour in English and really enjoyed hearing the history is this place.
Patrick Harryson (16 months ago)
You have to visit this beautiful old castle it has so much history and its a great museum
Fredrik Sunesson (17 months ago)
Nice guided tour and great surroundings.
Filip Al Bouz (17 months ago)
Amazing place beautiful views
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