Torpa stenhus is a well preserved medieval castle near Åsunden. The first stone house was built around 1470 by Privy Council Arvid Knutsson as fortress against the Danes. Reconstruction and remodeling took during the 1500s and 1600s. In the late 1500s the castle was enlarged and modernized: the 4th floor was added, the tower was erected and halls were decorated with beautiful paintings. The castle has still today a well-preserved Renaissance interior. The castle is best known in history as the manor of the Swedish noble family of Stenbock. It was the residence of Catherine Stenbock, third and last consort of King Gustaf Vasa.

The first half of 17th century was a heyday of Torpa Stenhus. Gustav Otto Stenbock built a new wooden manor house adjacent to the stone castle, which was used for representative events. The baroque style chapel was also built and decorated in the late 1699.

Later Torpa has been owned by Sjöblad and Sparre families. Today it hosts a hotel, restaurant and conference center.

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Address

Torpa 2, Länghem, Sweden
See all sites in Länghem

Details

Founded: 1470
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sov whorulesall (2 years ago)
I went when it was closed just to look around, but it was absolutely beautiful. I did not even get to go inside but the drive up was so magical, with trees on either side of the road and then a calm lake and the actual home.
Constantin Dragan (2 years ago)
Much more interesting inside than outside. Very well renovated and full of furnutures and stories.
Sefijon (2 years ago)
Amazing place for walking around and also do a museum tour. Highly recommend!
Anna-Karin Uhlén (2 years ago)
A breathtaking place with guided tours of the magnificent stone fortress. Lovely restaurant with hot n cold meals. If you are lucky the master of the fortress will be the guide. Picture shows one of the magnificent medeival rooms.
Ben Pesterfield (2 years ago)
An historic house in beautiful surroundings. The house itself was very interesting to explore. We were given a tour by a guide who spoke both Swedish and English, which was very useful. There is a lot of text around the house explaining the history of the family but it's all only in Swedish, so the guide is pretty essential if you don't speak/read Swedish (like me) as you wouldn't really get much out of the visit. We ate at the restaurant and the food was very nice and pretty good price. I visited here with family and we didn't spend that long here but if you wanted to read up on the history and explore the surrounding area a bit you could spend a full day here.
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