Ramundeboda Abbey Ruins

Finnerödja, Sweden

Ramundeboda Abbey belonged to the Hospital Brothers of St. Anthony and was established in the late 1400s. This was the only Antonines monastery in Sweden. After Reformation abbey's properties were seized in 1527. After that there was an inn until 1800s and the Ramundeboda Church between 1686-1688. The church was moved to Laxå in 1899.

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Address

E20, Finnerödja, Sweden
See all sites in Finnerödja

Details

Founded: c. 1475
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karin Brinck (2 years ago)
Nice place by the lake with tasty ice cream. Didn't test the food or the waffles, but looked real good.
Andreas Aronsson (2 years ago)
Simple. The surroundings are well worth a visit though!
aWebsheep (2 years ago)
Best cake ever and a nice view over a lake.
Bu Bu (2 years ago)
Wonderful quiet place with a nice cafe! Loved it!
Corina vH (2 years ago)
Nice place to take a rest and enjoy some nice food. They have a buffet. You can also take a coffee and they have all kinds of cookies. The old ruins and the lake make it a nice place for a walk. Also the restaurant is wheelchair accessible and it has a wheelchair accessible toilet.
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