Arktikum is the Provincial Museum of Lapland and Arctic Center. The exhibitions examine culture, history, and modern life in the Arctic. Concepts such as human life in tune with nature are explored in depth. In the Provincial Museum’s permanent exhibition “The Northern Ways” you will find out about the life and mothology e.g. of the moose and bear and you will also hear the sounds of the Lappish animals. The exhibition presents Sámi culture, with its costumes and languages, and small-scale models of Rovaniemi from 1939 and 1944 with the stories behind the buildings. In terms of time, the exhibition traverses from prehistory to the present day.

There are also various temporary exhibitions which are often linked to topical themes. These exhibitions are either put together by the museum itself, or are touring exhibitions on loan.

Reference: Official Website

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Details

Founded: 1992
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Spool Accounts (3 years ago)
A good museum to explain about the Arctic. Has some activities for the kids.
steve30avs (3 years ago)
Great museum for all things Arctic and Lapland.
Sinner (3 years ago)
A beautiful and informative place. Arktimum can even keep the kids interested because it also contains interactive areas that teach history in an interesting way.
Bùi Thị Tường Vy (3 years ago)
I had a really good time here exploring about Lapland. There is also exibition about Northern Lights where they get you lay down and enjoy the northern lights on screen. Their glass roof is perfect! Coffee shop is nice too :)
Mike Going (3 years ago)
Excellent museum. Well presented and very informative. The whole family was kept occupied for about 3 hours. Good selection in the gift shop too!
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