German Soldier Cemetery

Rovaniemi, Finland

The cemetery was founded in 1963 for the German Wehrmacht soldiers died in Lapland front during the World War II. It was built by the German organization Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge and consists over 2350 graves. There’s also a small and bare mausoleum made of rock.

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Details

Founded: 1963
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

karl tuira (13 months ago)
A truly memorable place. The idyllic and peaceful setting contrasting with the stark chapel and sculpture. The view from the chapel looks towards a tall simple iron cross placed on the point beside Lake Norvajarvi. An appropriate memorial to the 15,000 German soldiers who died in Lapland fighting Russia during WW II. While what Hitler did can not be condoned, the German soldiers were not monsters. As Mannerheim states " during the past years nothing whatsoever happened that could have induced us to consider the German troops intruders or oppressors." Mind you this changed when Finland's peace terms with Russia forced her to push the Germans out of Lapland, and Germany waged a scorched earth retreat (The loss of property was huge but less than a 1,000 Finnish soldiers died.) . The memorial was particularly moving to me being a Finn whose sister was saved during the war by a German doctor who later died in the last days of Berlin.
karl tuira (13 months ago)
A truly memorable place. The idyllic and peaceful setting contrasting with the stark chapel and sculpture. The view from the chapel looks towards a tall simple iron cross placed on the point beside Lake Norvajarvi. An appropriate memorial to the 15,000 German soldiers who died in Lapland fighting Russia during WW II. While what Hitler did can not be condoned, the German soldiers were not monsters. As Mannerheim states " during the past years nothing whatsoever happened that could have induced us to consider the German troops intruders or oppressors." Mind you this changed when Finland's peace terms with Russia forced her to push the Germans out of Lapland, and Germany waged a scorched earth retreat (The loss of property was huge but less than a 1,000 Finnish soldiers died.) . The memorial was particularly moving to me being a Finn whose sister was saved during the war by a German doctor who later died in the last days of Berlin.
Meylemans Paul (2 years ago)
This German Military Graveyard from the Second World War near Rovaniemi is located in a very beautiful spot on the shore of the Norvajärvi Lake. The chapel built from solid rock, the statue of a mother with her dead son-soldier and the rows of gravestones with hundreds of names engraved in them, contrast strongly with the almost idyllic environment.
Meylemans Paul (2 years ago)
This German Military Graveyard from the Second World War near Rovaniemi is located in a very beautiful spot on the shore of the Norvajärvi Lake. The chapel built from solid rock, the statue of a mother with her dead son-soldier and the rows of gravestones with hundreds of names engraved in them, contrast strongly with the almost idyllic environment.
mato krajo (2 years ago)
German soldiers memorial from the ll. World War
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