Rättvik Church

Rättvik, Sweden

Rättvik Church dates from c. 1300. It has been enlarged several times and its present shape is from 1793. The church contains some fascinating old inventory like a triumphal crucifix believed to have been made in Germany in the 14th century. There are also medieval frescoes depicting St. Olav and St. Stephen. The altarpiece depicting the Resurrection of Christ was made in the 17th century as well as the pulpit.

Around the church are 87 church stables, some are from the end of the 15th century. The stables were used to house the horses of parishioners while they attended services at the church.

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Address

Kyrkvägen, Rättvik, Sweden
See all sites in Rättvik

Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

wikimapia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johan Blom (3 years ago)
Jättefin kyrka
LARS INGVARSSON (3 years ago)
Trevligt med alla kyrkstallarna
Jossan Sandin (3 years ago)
Morfar är begraven där Så jobbigt att varA där
Anders Stromberg (3 years ago)
Många döingar
oscar broberg (5 years ago)
Väldigt vacker
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