The Skagen area suffered from severe problems with sand drift up through the 18th century and in 1795 the old church had to be abandoned. It was a brick church of considerable size dedicated to Saint Lawrence which dated from the beginning of the 15th century and located 2 km south-west of the town centre.

A new church was built in 1841 to the design of Christian Frederik Hansen. The design was adapted in 1909-10 by Ulrik Plesner who also designed a number of other buildings in Skagen. Plesner collaborated with Thorvald Bindesbøll on the interior. Anne L. Hansen created interior decorations and a new colour scheme in 1989.

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Ved Kirken 2, Skagen, Denmark
See all sites in Skagen

Details

Founded: 1841
Category: Religious sites in Denmark

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jørgen nielsen (2 months ago)
Hvis man kan lide at se på kirker så er det et godt sted
Jörg Bremer (5 months ago)
Diese Kirche ist der Nachfolgebau der versandeten Kirche, die 1795 aufgegeben wurde. Die Skagener Kirche wurde im neo-klassizischtischen Stil errichtet und 1841 eingeweiht. Damals hatte die Kirche noch keinen Turm. Die Glocke befand sich, wie noch bei vielen dänischen Kirchen in einem hölzernen Glockenstuhl neben der Kirche. 1910 wurde dann erweitert.
Shame A Name (6 months ago)
... beautiful church, the interior is simple but nice. boats hanging from the ceiling is a nice touch. if you wander in the streets, you won't miss it as the tower can be seen on the streets.
Olav Höse (7 months ago)
Fantastisk kyrka i den fina skagengula färgen. Liten men full av detaljer. Trevlig personal som gärna svarade på frågor.
Czarny Kopytkowiec (8 months ago)
Ładny i przyjemny kościół,bardzo ładna oprawa muzyczna podczas mszy.Warto przyjść chwile posiedzieć bedąc turystą i nie tylko.polecam
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