Skagen Old Church Ruins

Skagen, Denmark

Skagen Old church, also called as 'Sand-Covered Church' was built in the 14th century and dedicated to Saint Lawrence of Rome. It was a brick church of considerable size and located 2 km south-west of the town centre. The white church tower is all that is visible of the former church, the rest of it demolished and the neighboring village having been buried under the sand from nearby dunes.

The church was named for the patron saint of sailors, but was buried by sand from Råbjerg Milen. The desertification that hit the area in the 18th century led to the abandonment of the old parish church to the migrating sands. This area of dunes threatened the church and the village for centuries, and the planting of trees could not prevent further encroachment: the church itself was demolished in 1775. All the furniture, fittings, and interior decoration were sold or moved to a new church (Skagen Church 1841), while the church tower being left to rise above the sand.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Breitenbach (2 years ago)
Such a nice place!
Greta Schiavon (2 years ago)
Fascinating the idea of a church that doesn't exist anymore. Only the tower is still on foot and you can understand what the destiny of the building was!
Emre Yıldız (2 years ago)
very interesting site. should be seen...
Samuli Rantanen (2 years ago)
An old church that sand has taken over. Nice surroundings and nature also. About 500 m from the parking.
Gustav Christensson (3 years ago)
Far away from civilization, here's a church which will offer something different. Lovely old building in a wonderful natural landscape. Entrance to the church is free, as I understand it. Highly reccmmended!
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