Château de Blain

Blain, France

The Château de Blain was originally constructed by order of Alan IV, Duke of Brittany, around 1108. The fortress passed by marriage to the Clisson family in 1225. Following Olivier I de Clisson's revolt against the Duke, the castle was razed in 1260.

Olivier I's son, Olivier II obtained permission from the Duke to rebuild the castle. The Clissons progressively enlarged the castle during the 14th century. In 1407, the castle became the property of the House of Rohan. Louis, duc de Rohan is buried here. During the French Wars of Religion, the castle was besieged and set on fire in 1591 during the fighting between the Duke of Mercœur and Jean de Montauban, the knight De Goust. It was restored by Catherine de Parthenay, who installed herself there with her children. In 1628, Henri II de Rohan having become the leader of the Protestant princes, Cardinal Richelieu ordered the dismantling of the castle which thus lost its military role.

The castle suffered further serious damage during the French Revolution. It was pillaged and burnt, along with the Rohan family archives. It served as a barracks and later as a prison. It passed through the hands of several proprietors, including Marie Bonaparte in 1918. These owners remodelled the north wing (known as the Logis du Roy) and the Mill Tower (la tour du moulin).

The South West Tower and the Drawbridge Tower with the buildings on either side form the entrance to the castle. Along with the Constable's Tower (tour du Connétable), the two towers in the south east and the monumental entrance on the south facade of the logis du Roi, they date from before the 17th century. Together with the remains of the towers and the fortifications linking them, these have been classified as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture. The north wing of the logis du Roi was remodelled in the 19th century. The castle is home to a fresco centre and an ancient printshop. It has been listed since 1977 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olivier Leichtnam (2 years ago)
Un superbe château avec des expositions régulières un superbe marché de noël à visiter sans hésitation. Le logis à côté est à visiter étalement
Lydia Bossiere (3 years ago)
Château très simple bien entretenu Nous avons pu voir que le rez de chaussé, la salle de bal est magnifique
Emilien B (3 years ago)
Un très beau château, le pont à été rénové et l'intérieur à été complètement remis au goûts de l'époque. Une super idée de balade en famille lorsqu'on longe le canal. Je recommande pour tout ceux qui sont amateur d'art médiéval !
Ewen Barbaud (5 years ago)
Cool
Paul Perrin (5 years ago)
This is a lovely double-castle in rural area of Loire Atlantique (although considered part of historical Brittany). Be sure to climb the tower of the medieval castle to get good views of the site and nearby town, as well as seeing a recreation of a medieval bedroom.
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