The medieval church of Fuglse was originally dedicated to St Lawrence but after it was rebuilt in 1595 it was dedicated to the Holy Trinity. After the Reformation it was owned by the Crown until it was transferred to the prefect Henning Ulrich von Lützow in 1689 who gained ownership of nearby Søholt the following year. It later came into the ownership of Raben Huitfeld Levetzau til Kærstrup (1835) and then Baron Gottlob Rosenkrantz until it gained independence in 1916.

The old Romanesque church fell into such a bad state of repair that it was almost completely rebuilt by Henning Gøye til Kærstrup og Søholt in 1595. Now in the Renaissance style, the church consists of a chancel, nave and tower, with burial chapels to the north and south. Unusually, the north chapel is three-sided. More recently, a small porch was built on the west side of the tower. The chancel, nave and chapels are built of roughly-hued fieldstone with some brick while the tower is in red brick.

The Renaissance triptych altarpiece (1610), partly reconstructed from an earlier five-winged Late-Gothic work, contains a copy of Jacob Jordaens' Adoration of the Shepherds from 1618. The pulpit (c. 1600) bears copies of Thorvaldsen's carved figures of Peter, Paul and John which were added later. There are epitaphs to Henning Ulrich von Lützow and his two wives at the entrance to the burial chapel on the north side of the nave. The rather primitive baptismal font from the Romanesque period is in granite.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Fuglsevej 25B, Holeby, Denmark
See all sites in Holeby

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hanne Brant (2 years ago)
Flot kirke
Gerda Madsen (3 years ago)
Min arbejdsplads.
Kim Bruun (3 years ago)
Pragtfuld smukt beliggende kirke med enkelt interiør, der rækker tilbage til 1600-tallet.
Tina Rud Jensen (3 years ago)
Jan Sognnes Rasmussen (3 years ago)
En smuk kirke, der ligger på en stejl bakke, hvilket gør at den kan ses mange kilometer væk og er et vartegn for Fuglse. Kirken blev oprindeligt bygget omkring år 1100. Men i slutningen af 1500-tallet var den så forfalden at den måtte total renoveres. Kirken blev indviet i 1595 til Den Hellige Trefoldighed. Spiret har siden været udskiftet flere gange. Det nuværende spir er et kobbertag og blev indviet i 1990
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Les Invalides

Les Invalides is a complex of buildings containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building"s original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l"Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d"Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France"s war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte.

Louis XIV initiated the project in 1670, as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers: the name is a shortened form of hôpital des invalides. The architect of Les Invalides was Libéral Bruant. The enlarged project was completed in 1676, the river front measured 196 metres and the complex had fifteen courtyards. Jules Hardouin Mansart assisted the aged Bruant, and the chapel was finished in 1679 to Bruant"s designs after the elder architect"s death.

Shortly after the veterans" chapel was completed, Louis XIV commissioned Mansart to construct a separate private royal chapel referred to as the Église du Dôme from its most striking feature. Inspired by St. Peter"s Basilica in Rome, the original for all Baroque domes, it is one of the triumphs of French Baroque architecture. The domed chapel is centrally placed to dominate the court of honour. It was finished in 1708.

Because of its location and significance, the Invalides served as the scene for several key events in French history. On 14 July 1789 it was stormed by Parisian rioters who seized the cannons and muskets stored in its cellars to use against the Bastille later the same day. Napoleon was entombed under the dome of the Invalides with great ceremony in 1840. In December 1894 the degradation of Captain Alfred Dreyfus was held before the main building, while his subsequent rehabilitation ceremony took place in a courtyard of the complex in 1906.

The building retained its primary function of a retirement home and hospital for military veterans until the early twentieth century. In 1872 the musée d"artillerie (Artillery Museum) was located within the building to be joined by the Historical Museum of the Armies in 1896. The two institutions were merged to form the present musée de l"armée in 1905. At the same time the veterans in residence were dispersed to smaller centres outside Paris. The reason was that the adoption of a mainly conscript army, after 1872, meant a substantial reduction in the numbers of veterans having the twenty or more years of military service formerly required to enter the Hôpital des Invalides. The building accordingly became too large for its original purpose. The modern complex does however still include the facilities detailed below for about a hundred elderly or incapacitated former soldiers.