The medieval church of Fuglse was originally dedicated to St Lawrence but after it was rebuilt in 1595 it was dedicated to the Holy Trinity. After the Reformation it was owned by the Crown until it was transferred to the prefect Henning Ulrich von Lützow in 1689 who gained ownership of nearby Søholt the following year. It later came into the ownership of Raben Huitfeld Levetzau til Kærstrup (1835) and then Baron Gottlob Rosenkrantz until it gained independence in 1916.

The old Romanesque church fell into such a bad state of repair that it was almost completely rebuilt by Henning Gøye til Kærstrup og Søholt in 1595. Now in the Renaissance style, the church consists of a chancel, nave and tower, with burial chapels to the north and south. Unusually, the north chapel is three-sided. More recently, a small porch was built on the west side of the tower. The chancel, nave and chapels are built of roughly-hued fieldstone with some brick while the tower is in red brick.

The Renaissance triptych altarpiece (1610), partly reconstructed from an earlier five-winged Late-Gothic work, contains a copy of Jacob Jordaens' Adoration of the Shepherds from 1618. The pulpit (c. 1600) bears copies of Thorvaldsen's carved figures of Peter, Paul and John which were added later. There are epitaphs to Henning Ulrich von Lützow and his two wives at the entrance to the burial chapel on the north side of the nave. The rather primitive baptismal font from the Romanesque period is in granite.

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Address

Fuglsevej 25B, Holeby, Denmark
See all sites in Holeby

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hanne Brant (2 years ago)
Flot kirke
Gerda Madsen (3 years ago)
Min arbejdsplads.
Kim Bruun (3 years ago)
Pragtfuld smukt beliggende kirke med enkelt interiør, der rækker tilbage til 1600-tallet.
Tina Rud Jensen (3 years ago)
Jan Sognnes Rasmussen (3 years ago)
En smuk kirke, der ligger på en stejl bakke, hvilket gør at den kan ses mange kilometer væk og er et vartegn for Fuglse. Kirken blev oprindeligt bygget omkring år 1100. Men i slutningen af 1500-tallet var den så forfalden at den måtte total renoveres. Kirken blev indviet i 1595 til Den Hellige Trefoldighed. Spiret har siden været udskiftet flere gange. Det nuværende spir er et kobbertag og blev indviet i 1990
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