Utsjoki Church is designed by Ernst Lohrmann and it was built of stone in 1850-1853. Old church houses are from the 19th century. All the 14 church houses have been renovated.

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Address

E75, Utsjoki, Finland
See all sites in Utsjoki

Details

Founded: 1850-1853
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.saariselka.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Taija Honkala (2 years ago)
Kivasti korkealla paikalla sijaitsee.
Marin Adela (2 years ago)
Small and interesting
Paulo Lopes (2 years ago)
It was nice to see the (small) village that sustained/supported the church. The church itself was closed so we wouldn't see it inside. However, the old houses from the village were open and one could see them inside. The citizens could document it better so that it would retain more tourists and transmit their history better too.
Bernard Vandeginste (2 years ago)
Hulde aan de vrijwilligers die deze site openhouden. In een van de blokhutten werden we verwelkomd met koffie en vers gebakken pannekoeken. Jammer voor de haastige bezoeker die snel terugrent naar zijn auto om verder te rijden.
Minsung Kim (6 years ago)
my overnight place near the church
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