Sodankylä Old Church

Sodankylä, Finland

Built in 1689 for the people of central Lapland, the old timber church in Sodankylä is one of the wooden churches to survive in Lapland and one of the oldest in Finland. Following the completion of the new stone church, the old church was decommissioned in 1859. In terms of style, the church is a sample of Finnish medieval ecclesiastic architecture and Ostrobothnian wooden church designs. The church was restored in 1926 and the shingled roof and external cladding repaired during 1992-95 by the National Board on Antiquities. The church is unique in having preserved its original design and atmosphere throughout centuries.

Prayer meetings are held in the church in summer, and it is a specially popular venue for weddings.

Reference: Sodankylä Municipality

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Details

Founded: 1689
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

More Information

www.sodankyla.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Mirka (9 months ago)
Vanha puukirkko, kannattaa tutustua
Fennec Elisabeth (12 months ago)
Au milieu d'un bosquet et complètement cernée par une clôture de bois très travaillée, une belle église en bois debout. L’église same de Sodankylä, la gamla kyrka, est l’une des plus anciennes églises en bois de Finlande. C'est l'un des rares bâtiments à avoir survécu à la politique de la terre brulée de l'armée allemande battant en retraite vers la fin de la seconde guerre mondiale. De la vieille église part un sentier formant une courte boucle et agrémenté de panneaux décrivant la nature locale ainsi que de poèmes gravés dans des pierres, connu sous le nom de Pappilanniemen luontopolku (sentier nature de Pappilanniemi). À quelques pas de là, une statue de bronze représentant un Sámi aux prises avec un renne constitue l'un des symboles du village. Le Sámi porte un bonnet dit : des 4 vents En voici la belle légende : Il y a fort longtemps la Laponie était inhabitée, car quatre vents soufflaient en tout sens. Un jour, un chaman réussit à les dompter en les invitant dans sa hutte chaude. Il les enferma dans son chapeau et finit par les relâcher à une seule condition: les vents ne devaient plus souffler ensemble, mais les uns après les autres. Depuis, la Laponie est habitée et les Sámis portent des chapeaux aux quatre vents en souvenir de cette légende.
Luis Fernando Perez Sanz (20 months ago)
En medio de un bonito parque y con fina lluvia nos dimos de bruces con la Iglesia quizás mas antigua de Finlandia. Una preciosa construcción de madera y que según cuentan, debajo de la misma se encuentra las tumbas de los sacerdotes que ha tenido la misma. Una pena porque aparte de que estaba cerrada, la fina lluvia nos hizo abandonar el lugar a toda prisa.
Raili Karvonen-Willman (2 years ago)
Ihana käyntikohde joka kesä. Osa kylän historiaa.
Jakub Kracík (3 years ago)
Wooow. The best of church
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