Sodankylä Old Church

Sodankylä, Finland

Built in 1689 for the people of central Lapland, the old timber church in Sodankylä is one of the wooden churches to survive in Lapland and one of the oldest in Finland. Following the completion of the new stone church, the old church was decommissioned in 1859. In terms of style, the church is a sample of Finnish medieval ecclesiastic architecture and Ostrobothnian wooden church designs. The church was restored in 1926 and the shingled roof and external cladding repaired during 1992-95 by the National Board on Antiquities. The church is unique in having preserved its original design and atmosphere throughout centuries.

Prayer meetings are held in the church in summer, and it is a specially popular venue for weddings.

Reference: Sodankylä Municipality

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Details

Founded: 1689
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

More Information

www.sodankyla.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

David Caballero (8 months ago)
It may not be worth going expressly, but if you pass through the area, be sure to visit the church and the attached cemetery. A beauty, an island of tranquility. We visited in winter and the atmosphere with the snow is fantastic
Pertti A. Ervasti (15 months ago)
The odour of tar was good.
Vesa W (16 months ago)
Really old and magnificent church. I recommend to visit. It’s kind of a miracle that it still exists but good so!
Milla Ahola (3 years ago)
Impressive old wooden church, a fascinating place to visit. However, it's important to note that you can only visit the inside during summer!
Mirka (4 years ago)
Vanha puukirkko, kannattaa tutustua
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