Chateau de Moulin le Comte

Aire-sur-la-Lys, France

We are pleased to welcome you to Château de Moulin le Comte, our stylish nineteenth century mansion (1850), renovated with care and passion in the summer of 2012. The original character of the building has been carefully preserved. Through the large castle garden flows the river Leie. The quiet and peace of the environment is much appreciated by our guests.

You will enjoy the warm and congenial atmosphere at our private house. Our five guestrooms are very spacious and have been provided with the best modern comfort. The luxurious beds have top quality Sealy mattresses (180/200/22 or 90/200/22). In every room you can opt for one double bed or twin beds. Each room has its own bathroom with shower and toilet facilities.

Families with children are very welcome. Pets are allowed. Personal service, hospitality and flexibility are key words here. Your hosts speak Dutch, French, English and German.

Château de Moulin Le Comte is the perfect location for a visit to nearby cities such as Béthune, Saint-Omer, Lens, Louvre Lens, Arras and Lille.

The centre of Aire-sur-la-Lys is only 1.5 km away and in less than an hour you are in Boulogne-Sur-Mer, Lens, Le Touquet, Calais, Arras, Lille, …

If you prefer the quiet and peace of the countryside, you will definitely enjoy a biking tour or a stroll in the village and its picturesque surroundings.

All our prices include bed and breakfast. Our table d’hôte has an outstanding reputation, as we serve very refined and carefully prepared dishes at a reasonable price.

Aperitifs are served in our lounge or, if the weather permits, on our cosy terrace.

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Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Deborah Carvel (21 months ago)
Lovley place .. great food .. really dog friendly.. 45 mins from eaurotunnel..
Deborah Carvel (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to stay .. pleasant food and good complimentary breakfast ..friendly hosts ..would recommend..good location for over night stay close to the euro tunnel
Elaine M Biggs (2 years ago)
Excellent place to stay, large comfy rooms and superb food.
Tony Smith (2 years ago)
A very nice place to stay. Francis and his son are very welcoming and made our stay very pleasant indeed. It's right in the countryside only a few houses around it so very quiet. You need to follow the hotel directions as my Garmin satnav got up really lost and as it's in the countryside the cell reception is not that great so loading the hotel directions took some time.
Tony docs Smith (3 years ago)
It is a very nice place to stay. Out in the country side away from everything so relaxing. The Château is so lovely and the owner Francis is very welcoming. Only stayed for one night in Dec as a weekend away had intended to visit some local attractions but on the morning of our stay it snowed quite heavy so decided to return to Calais area.
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Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

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The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.