Arras Town Hall

Arras, France

The Gothic town hall of Arras and its belfry were constructed between 1463 and 1554 and had to be rebuilt in a slightly less grandiose style after World War I. The belfry is 75 meters high and used to serve as a watchtower. Nowadays tourists can enjoy ascending the belfry.

The belfry of the town hall is part of the UNESCO World Heritage site of The Belfries of Belgium and France (the group of 56 historical buildings).

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dogtrey24 said 3 years ago
how much does the building actually cost?


Details

Founded: 1463-1554
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katina Howard (3 years ago)
It's a Grand Hall rather eerie with the Gothic statues and giant Figures which I think are puppets I'm not sure about that though. Arras is an intriguing place, I love the old cobblestone Square's that's rest diagonal to each other, it a shame that they are carparks now and not the Market Squares they once were nevertheless the buildings that edge both squares are amazingly how they have stood the test of time and the devastation of the War's that have plagued France, Still a Beauty to Behold.
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