Muckle Flugga Lighthouse

Haroldswick, United Kingdom

Muckle Flugga lighthouse was designed and built by the brothers Thomas and David Stevenson in 1854, originally to protect ships during the Crimean War. First lit on 1 January 1858, it stands 20 m high, has 103 steps to the top, and is Britain's most northerly lighthouse. In March 1995 it was fully automated.

In 1851 it was decided to build a lighthouse on north Unst but, because of difficulties in determining the exact location, nothing had been done by the start of 1854. During the Crimean War, the government urged the commissioners to set up a light on Muckle Flugga to protect Her Majesty's ships. A temporary lighthouse 15 m high was built 61 m above sea level and lit on 11 October 1854. It was thought to be high and safe enough to withstand the elements, but when winter storms began waves broke heavily on the tower and burst open the door to the living quarters. The principal keeper reported that 12 m of stone dyke had been broken down, and the keepers had no dry place to sit or sleep. Plans were made for a higher and more permanent lighthouse, but there were still disagreements about where to locate it, Muckle Flugga or Lamba Ness. The orders to start the work on the new Muckle Flugga tower were finally given in June 1855. The lighthouse's original name was 'North Unst', but in 1964 that was changed to 'Muckle Flugga'.

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    Founded: 1855-1857
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    4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Aurel Daniel (2 years ago)
    Sam Livings (2 years ago)
    Amazing scenery, winds that will take your breath away and driving rain that soaks you to the skin in seconds. The view of this farthest north part of the UK was worth the adventure to get there.
    Maldwyn Price (4 years ago)
    Northern most point of UK.
    Rob Lowe (4 years ago)
    Best sight ever ... truly awesome
    ali jee (4 years ago)
    Very peaceful
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