Knuthenborg Manor

Bandholm, Denmark

Knuthenborg is a manor house originally known as Årsmarke. It was first mentioned in 1372 and owned by the Urne family from 1527. Under King Frederick III, Cornelius Pederson Lerche was granted ownership of the estate in 1667. In 1677, his daughter Sister Lerche married the Mecklenberg nobleman Christoffer von Knuth who, on inheriting Aarsmarke, did much to improve it through extensions and increased prosperity. In 1714, their son Adam Christoffer von Knuth was elevated to the status of a count under Frederick IV which resulted in the change of name of the estate to Knuthenborg.

An older residence was still standing when the current structure was under construction. Today's manor house, also known as Enkesædet, was built by the architect Henrik Steffens Sibbern in 1866 in the Victorian style and was extended in 1886. A tower of French design with a pointed spire crowns one of its corners. Several other interesting buildings on the estate were built by Sibbern in the 1860s and 1870s, all with distinct appearances and features. Egehuset (the Oak House) in the Swiss style looks a little like a Tyrolean chalet. Flinterhuset (the Flint House), built literally in flint, is the most elaborate building with many fireplaces and chimneys true to the English tradition. The imposing Godsforvalterboligen (Forest Superintendent’s Residence) is accessed through the corner tower. Sibbern also built Maglemerporten, the majestic main gatehouse and porter's residence while Vilhelm Tvede (1826–1891) added the gatehouses at Snapind.

Eggert Knuth (1838-1874) called upon the English landscape architect Edward Milner to lay out the park in the late 1860s, creating artificial lakes fed by streams running through the estate. Nils Stenson was then working as the Chief Landscape Gardener to the Count of Kunthenborg. His son, Herman Stenson, who was assisting his father as a young boy and grew up in the estate's Hunting pavilion, had also made very lovely drawings of the Kunthenborg palace and the garden. Eggert Knuth died in 1870 at the young age of 36, when the basic layout had been completed as can be seen from a relatively simple map dated 1881. Many of the finer details from Milner's original design were missing but today's garden nevertheless reflects his general concept. Adam V. Knuth who succeeded Eggert added the fanciful ruin near the main entrance, typical of the follies in English gardens of the times. In 1926, the park was the first of its kind to be listed. As a result it was opened to visitors and further developed, especially, with large displays of rhododendrons. In addition to beech, there are oak, poplar, and coniferous trees, and a Sequoia gigantea.

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Details

Founded: 1866
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Theresa Koch (4 months ago)
Amazing park! The animals have plenty space and the experience to be in the middle of the whole scenery is incredible. Would definitely come again when around :)!
Mette H (4 months ago)
Beautiful safari park in the south of Denmark. Park is very well kept with large areas for many beautiful animals. Also has a dinosaur Park and a super playground. Bring your own lunch and enjoy at one of the many perfectly located picnic spots. Lunch can be bought in the park but is on the pricey side.
T. Egengas (5 months ago)
Simply Amazing, must see. This is the best Zoo we have ever visited. once in a lifetime: we got to see the white wolves catch a hare - and eat it.
Mark Svensson (5 months ago)
Knuthenborg has always been the place to go for our summer vacation in Denmark, and it never fails to entertain. Even now, when I'm 22 years old, i still tell my mom to drive to the horses or goats, so i can pet them. That's, of course, the most important part of the trip. Of course you also got more exotic animals, like monkeys, zebras, giraffes and of course the tigers, which area has gotten a significant upgrade. All in all, a wonderful place, where the animals look like they're treated well. I don't think there will ever be a day, where i won't recommend Knuthenborg Park.
rainypraha (5 months ago)
Just wow! I never expected such a SAFARI in Denmark. You can drive around the grassland to see and touch(some of animals) animals with your own car and well made Dino robots in a life scale are bringing you to Jurassic period. The area is bit too small compare to the safari area but still very nice. There are also many spots where you can enjoy picnic. Bring your own food and drinks to enjoy the safari more and longer. Must go spot with your kids!
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