Knuthenborg Manor

Bandholm, Denmark

Knuthenborg is a manor house originally known as Årsmarke. It was first mentioned in 1372 and owned by the Urne family from 1527. Under King Frederick III, Cornelius Pederson Lerche was granted ownership of the estate in 1667. In 1677, his daughter Sister Lerche married the Mecklenberg nobleman Christoffer von Knuth who, on inheriting Aarsmarke, did much to improve it through extensions and increased prosperity. In 1714, their son Adam Christoffer von Knuth was elevated to the status of a count under Frederick IV which resulted in the change of name of the estate to Knuthenborg.

An older residence was still standing when the current structure was under construction. Today's manor house, also known as Enkesædet, was built by the architect Henrik Steffens Sibbern in 1866 in the Victorian style and was extended in 1886. A tower of French design with a pointed spire crowns one of its corners. Several other interesting buildings on the estate were built by Sibbern in the 1860s and 1870s, all with distinct appearances and features. Egehuset (the Oak House) in the Swiss style looks a little like a Tyrolean chalet. Flinterhuset (the Flint House), built literally in flint, is the most elaborate building with many fireplaces and chimneys true to the English tradition. The imposing Godsforvalterboligen (Forest Superintendent’s Residence) is accessed through the corner tower. Sibbern also built Maglemerporten, the majestic main gatehouse and porter's residence while Vilhelm Tvede (1826–1891) added the gatehouses at Snapind.

Eggert Knuth (1838-1874) called upon the English landscape architect Edward Milner to lay out the park in the late 1860s, creating artificial lakes fed by streams running through the estate. Nils Stenson was then working as the Chief Landscape Gardener to the Count of Kunthenborg. His son, Herman Stenson, who was assisting his father as a young boy and grew up in the estate's Hunting pavilion, had also made very lovely drawings of the Kunthenborg palace and the garden. Eggert Knuth died in 1870 at the young age of 36, when the basic layout had been completed as can be seen from a relatively simple map dated 1881. Many of the finer details from Milner's original design were missing but today's garden nevertheless reflects his general concept. Adam V. Knuth who succeeded Eggert added the fanciful ruin near the main entrance, typical of the follies in English gardens of the times. In 1926, the park was the first of its kind to be listed. As a result it was opened to visitors and further developed, especially, with large displays of rhododendrons. In addition to beech, there are oak, poplar, and coniferous trees, and a Sequoia gigantea.

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Founded: 1866
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johnny Højfeldt (3 years ago)
This is how a "ZOO" should be. Most of the animals have large areas to roam 'free'. So if you want to get close to wild and exotic animals, and not traveling the globe, this is the best solution. Especially for the animals involved, as they have a much better life here, than in small concrete cages that is the norm in normal ZOO's. They also have a relative new play land with lot's of good entertainment and rides for the children. This is a definite winner.
Henrik Koudahl (3 years ago)
Definitely worth a visit. Don 't miss the dinosaurs.....
Sascha Berlin (3 years ago)
We spent the whole day in this park and it was simply amazing. It's perfect for kids, especially since you can get out of the car in several areas. You've got everything there from huge giraffes to tiny monkeys :} The playground is a huge bonus as well and we also very much liked the dinosaur area. 7 hours went by so quickly.
Nemo Ashen (3 years ago)
If you love animals, and want to get up close and personal, Knuthenborg is just the place for you. You will be able to drive around at your own pace, and most of the time the animals will come all the way up to your car. In some areas you are even allowed to go around among the animals.
Henrik Gullaksen (3 years ago)
Nice place. Limited animals compared to a Zoo. But they have room to run around. And you can pet a lot of the animals if tje animals will let you. And lot of places to make picnic.
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