St. Peter's Church

Næstved, Denmark

St. Peter's Church is first mentioned in a monasterial letter from 1135. Built of red brick, it is one of Denmark's largest and finest Gothic buildings, scarcely altered since 1375. The chancel, with its five tall windows, is particularly impressive. The current Gothic church replaces an older Romanesque cross-shaped building built of limestone and brick from the second half of the 12th century. This in turn was built on the site of an even older stone church with two western towers.

The church's most famous mural painting is on the north wall of the chancel. It depicts Valdemar IV and Queen Helvig. There are other wall paintings in the church which have not been uncovered since they were coated with limewash after the Reformation.

The most imposing feature of the church is the pulpit, designed by Lorentz Jørgensen of Holbæk in 1671. Two rows of choir stalls and a bronze font date back to about 1500. The altarpiece is headed by a late-Gothic arched crucifix from 1844. The church also contains a number of gravestones and epitaphs dedicated to the families of Næstved.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Diana Hansen (22 months ago)
Stor flot gammel bykirke
Annette Lund (2 years ago)
Flot kirke god præst
Ulla Hasselberg (2 years ago)
Dejligt sted og skøn præst
William (2 years ago)
Deze kerk verdient een bezoek als je in Amsterdam bent. Op loopafstand van het Centraal Station.
FstTuller Petersen (8 years ago)
Im here
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