Blaker Fortress

Blaker, Norway

Blaker Fortress is one of the Norwegian fortresses which were constructed in the period of intense competition among the Baltic powers (Denmark-Norway, Sweden, Russia, Poland and the German states) for northern supremacy. In 1675 Gyldenløve indicated an intent to construct a fortress in the Glomma river where Blaker (a former township in Akershus) lies as part of his general program of Norwegian fortification upgrades. His objective was a stronghold available both to serve as a safe defensive position when necessary and a location to station troops who could take the offensive against invaders when the opportunity availed itself.

Blaker Fortress saw action in 1718, when it was surrounded by the invading Swedish army, but the siege collapsed upon the death of Charles XII of Sweden in front of Fredriksten Fortress. From 1917 to 2003 it was a place for education of craftsmen, art teachers and designers. Today, the old fortress is used for offices, cultural creativity, happenings, weddings, parties, exhibitions, meeting, courses and conferences.Historical walks on the fortress, ghost walks, theater, discourses, salute with canon and rental of costumes from the 1700s and 1800s.

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Address

Skansevegen 27, Blaker, Norway
See all sites in Blaker

Details

Founded: 1675
Category: Castles and fortifications in Norway

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wenche Linnerud (3 years ago)
Hyggelig omgivelser og koselig julemarked
Trond Bøler (3 years ago)
Flott sted, mye historie i veggene.
Daniel Tønsberg (3 years ago)
Flott område. Litt dyrt for drikke under konserter..
Vibeke Meland (3 years ago)
Spennende og svært idyllisk sted av historisk betydning. Uteteater og marked om sommeren. Sjekk deres fb-side for info.
Anna Petrova (3 years ago)
The best place to vel eneste 17 mai when you live om Blaker. Beautiful old buildings, cafe with cosy atmosphere. This place was recommended me by old Norwegian lady, and she is right!
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