Christiansfjell Fortress Ruins

Elverum, Norway

Christiansfjel Fortress was initially established by Count Wedel-Jarlsberg in 1683 as Hammersberg Skanse. A tower with a cellar powder magazine was among the first buildings at this Norwegian fortress. During Christian V's 1685 visit to Norway he visited Hammersberg skanse on June 14th. Recognizing its important location on the Swedish border, he renamed the fortress Christiansfjell and directed continued improvements. An extensive report of the visit includes illustrations of the fortress at that time.

After the Great Northern War some of the smaller border forts were determined to be more expensive than their utility justified and they were closed. On July 13, 1742 Christiansfjell Fortress was closed and the materials were moved to Kongsvinger Fortress.

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Founded: 1683
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

LinxLynx71 (2 years ago)
Again Grodd.
Jan Fløtten (3 years ago)
Fin bane?
Łukasz Giziński (3 years ago)
It's ok. But it's not crazy. While in the area, you can go on a little sightseeing.
Lime (3 years ago)
Fantastic course with the challengers and varied holes
Zoya Strand (3 years ago)
If you want to take a a trip with your family, so that is a wrong place to be. It just Bresbee area for teenagers
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