Sulkava Hill Fort

Sulkava, Finland

The hill fort is located to the rock hill with high cliffs in Pisamalahti. The hill fort rises about 55 meters above Enovesi lake.

First record of the fort dates back to the year 1561, but it was probably built in the Iron or Middle Ages. According one hypothesis it was built by Carelian people against conquerors from Tavastia (Häme) historical province. There is a 120 meters long and 2-3 meters high stone wall on the top of the hill.

Pisamalahti hill fort is one of the most valuable ancient fortresses in Finland. The hill and the surrounding lake landscape are popular tourist attraction in the Sulkava area.

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Details

Founded: 1100-1300
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Iron Age (Finland)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Valeria e.g.Smith (11 months ago)
For those who like simple pleasures: a short hike, a bit of exercise (if you decided to climb narrow stairs) and great views from the top. Leftovers of the fort are difficult to identify, but for a nature experience - everything is here. Also, a simple harbor for those arriving by boat is available.
Vadim Babashkin (2 years ago)
Great view. Special experience to be in the spot. We also had a very nice grill lunch. (Shelter, wood, tables, sits included).
Christiane Butlin (2 years ago)
Nice little walkway and fantastic over view from the top.
Chris Kamppi (2 years ago)
Great part of Finnish/Swedish history.
Matti Muhonen (3 years ago)
Amazing rock formation!
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