Fantoft Stave Church

Bergen, Norway

Fantoft Stave Church is a reconstructed stave church, originally built in Fortun in Sogn around the year 1150. In the 19th century the church was threatened by demolition, as were hundreds of other stave churches in Norway. The church was bought by consul Fredrik Georg Gade and saved by moving it in pieces to Fantoft near (now in) Bergen in 1883. Outside the church stands a stone cross from Tjora in Sola.

On 6 June 1992, the church was destroyed by arson; the first in a string of church burnings by members of the early Norwegian black metal scene. At first, the fire was thought to have been caused by lightning or an electrical failure. In 1994, Varg Vikernes of the one-man band Burzum was found guilty of burning Åsane Church and Storetveit Church in Bergen, the burning of Skjold Church in Vindafjord, and the burning of Holmenkollen Chapel in Oslo. He was also charged with the burning of Fantoft stave church, although the jurors voted not guilty. The judges called this an error but did not overthrow the whole case. A photograph of the church's burnt shell appears on the cover of the 1993 Burzum EP Aske (Norwegian for 'ashes'). According to Vikernes, the church was burnt as retaliation against Christianity for building a church on sacred, pagan grounds. Reconstruction of the church began soon after the fire and was completed in 1997.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1150
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Irad Medina (2 years ago)
The church was unfortunately closed for constructions, but it's nice to see from the outside. Parking is at the bottom of the hill, and there's a short walk with stairs to get there.
John A whelan (2 years ago)
Small historical very small, if you are in the area well worth a visit, stop by and say a little prayer.
Dominik Halley (2 years ago)
Nice small Church. Its worth a visit!
Hanna Wolter (2 years ago)
Beautiful stave church, in my opinion one of the best out of the 23 that exist around Norway. It's quite hidden at the top of a little hill in the middle of the woods which you need to walk uphill (takes only 10min but not wheelchair accessible). There are hardly any tourists and you need to pay to enter it. Only 3 stars because the church is surrounded by a fence ruining all the pictures and the romantic setting.
Kelley Smith (2 years ago)
Fun little slice of architecture. Although this is a rebuild, you can still get a sense of history when visiting. Cashiers were very helpful with history and information, visit was free with our Bergen Card. Signage to this place could be better. After putting the address into the GPS, it was not obvious that it was down a secretive walking trail in the woods.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Medvedgrad

Medvedgrad is a medieval fortified town located on the south slopes of Medvednica mountain, approximately halfway from the Croatian capital Zagreb to the mountain top Sljeme. For defensive purposes it was built on a hill, Mali Plazur, that is a spur of the main ridge of the mountain that overlooks the city. On a clear day the castle can be seen from far away, especially the high main tower. Below the main tower of the castle is Oltar Domovine (Altar of the homeland) which is dedicated to Croatian soldiers killed in the Croatian War of Independence.

In 1242, Mongols invaded Zagreb. The city was destroyed and burned to the ground. This prompted the building of Medvedgrad. Encouraged by Pope Innocent IV, Philip Türje, bishop of Zagreb, built the fortress between 1249 and 1254. It was later owned by bans of Slavonia. Notable Croatian and Hungarian poet and ban of Slavonia Janus Pannonius (Ivan Česmički) died in the Medvedgrad castle on March 27, 1472.

The last Medvedgrad owners and inhabitants was the Gregorijanec family, who gained possession of Medvedgrad in 1562. In 1574, the walls of Medvedgrad were reinforced, but after the 1590 Neulengbach earthquake, the fortress was heavily damaged and ultimately abandoned. It remained in ruins until the late 20th century, when it was partly restored and now offers a panoramic view of the city from an altitude of over 500 meters.