Christ Church Ruins

Bergen, Norway

Christ Church was the main church and cathedral of Bergen in the Middle Ages. The church was built by King Olav Kyrre during the period 1066-1093. The church was situated north of Haakon's hall, the King's hall. It was dedicated to the Holy Trinity but was always known as Christ Church. In 1170 the relics of Saint Sunniva were moved here from Selja and placed on the main altar.

During Bergen's period as the capital of Norway in the 13th century, Holmen and Christ Church was the political centre of the country. The church itself was used for negotiations and the churchyard was used for hailing of kings and meetings of the realm. The first coronation in Scandinavia was held in Bergen in 1163 and several royal coronations were held in the church when it was finished. The kings were also married and buried in the church.

In 1531 the church was levelled to the ground by order of Eske Bille, the Danish governor of Bergenhus Fortress. Today the outline of the church is marked by a hedge. A memorial to Saint Sunniva and the royals buried there is placed on the site of the high altar.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Bergenhus 13, Bergen, Norway
See all sites in Bergen

Details

Founded: 1066-1093
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror (Topographie des Terrors) is an outdoor and indoor history museum. It is located on Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, on the site of buildings which during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945 were the headquarters of the Gestapo and the SS, the principal instruments of repression during the Nazi era.

The buildings that housed the Gestapo and SS headquarters were largely destroyed by Allied bombing during early 1945 and the ruins demolished after the war. The boundary between the American and Soviet zones of occupation in Berlin ran along the Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, so the street soon became a fortified boundary, and the Berlin Wall ran along the south side of the street, renamed Niederkirchnerstrasse, from 1961 to 1989. The wall here was never demolished.