Dendrochronological dating of wood samples indicate that Nore stave church was built after 1167. The church was built with galleries, a chancel and cross naves - an architectural style that was unique in Europe during the Middle Ages. This style is called the Nummedals-type. The church also has a central mast, that was originally the support for a tower, mostly likely containing church bells. The walls and ceiling of the interior are decorated with murals, among them scenes from the Bible presented as riddles. The chancel was replaced in 1683 and the spokes of the nave in the first half of 18th century.

In 1888, art historian, professor of art history and author, Lorentz Dietrichson (1834 - 1917), became the owner of the church. Professor Dietrichson, who had played a major role in founding the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments (Fortidsminneforeningen), donated the property to the society in 1890.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

250MercedesTD (3 years ago)
Stefan Stöhr (4 years ago)
The stave church of Nore is very beautiful. It is located in a small hill with a lot of woods surrounding the place. It is a quiet small stave church nur it is worth a visit in any case. Nore stave church was built in the year 1167. Walking around the place and making photos or just have some quiet minutes ans join zur atmosphere of the place is very nice. A visit worth in any case.
Ragnar Tollefsen (4 years ago)
Fin stavkirke bygget rundt år 1167. Idyllisk plassering i et naturskjønt landskap.
Mikica Jovanovic (4 years ago)
Marianne Skage (5 years ago)
Fantastisk sjarmerende gammel stavkirke som ligger idyllisk til ved Norefjorden
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.