Dendrochronological dating of wood samples indicate that Nore stave church was built after 1167. The church was built with galleries, a chancel and cross naves - an architectural style that was unique in Europe during the Middle Ages. This style is called the Nummedals-type. The church also has a central mast, that was originally the support for a tower, mostly likely containing church bells. The walls and ceiling of the interior are decorated with murals, among them scenes from the Bible presented as riddles. The chancel was replaced in 1683 and the spokes of the nave in the first half of 18th century.

In 1888, art historian, professor of art history and author, Lorentz Dietrichson (1834 - 1917), became the owner of the church. Professor Dietrichson, who had played a major role in founding the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments (Fortidsminneforeningen), donated the property to the society in 1890.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

250MercedesTD (7 months ago)
Stefan Stöhr (8 months ago)
The stave church of Nore is very beautiful. It is located in a small hill with a lot of woods surrounding the place. It is a quiet small stave church nur it is worth a visit in any case. Nore stave church was built in the year 1167. Walking around the place and making photos or just have some quiet minutes ans join zur atmosphere of the place is very nice. A visit worth in any case.
Ragnar Tollefsen (11 months ago)
Fin stavkirke bygget rundt år 1167. Idyllisk plassering i et naturskjønt landskap.
Mikica Jovanovic (12 months ago)
Marianne Skage (2 years ago)
Fantastisk sjarmerende gammel stavkirke som ligger idyllisk til ved Norefjorden
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