Torpo Stave Church

Ål, Norway

Built in 1192, the Torpo stave church is the oldest building within the valley and traditional district of Hallingdal. The church was dedicated to Saint Margareta. The stave church was purchased by the municipality in 1875. It was initially planned to expand it with an annex to the east, but in 1879 it was decided instead to modernize the interior with new ceiling and gallery. Following protest from the Ancient Monuments Society, the municipality decided to build a new church on the adjacent property. The new church was built north of the old one with the two churches standing side by side.

The Torpo stave church is one of two stave churches that are signed by the their craftsmen, the other being the church at Ål. In both churches a runic inscription reads: Torolf built this church. The full runic inscription in the Torpo stave church, which is listed as N 110 in the Rundata catalog, reads: Þórolfr made this church. Ásgrímr, Hákon, Erlingr, Páll, Eindriði, Sjaundi, Þórulfr. Þórir carved. Ólafr.

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Address

Torpovegen 36, Ål, Norway
See all sites in Ål

Details

Founded: 1192
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jakob De Vries (8 months ago)
Die Kirche ist wunderschön, nur wenn man hinein will soll man bezahlen. Ein Blick durch die Fenster genügt.
Inger Torunn Knutshaug Nygård (12 months ago)
Flott historisk grunn.
anastasia puppis (12 months ago)
Visita guidata incantevole, grazie a due giovani guide molto simpatiche disponibili e competenti. Atmosfera siggestiva. Ingresso 6€ a persona.
J O (19 months ago)
Unique, beautiful, simple. Well worth a visit to this and many of the other Stave churches.
Ching-Fung Lin (2 years ago)
A small, simple, yet unique historical church.
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