Rødven Stave Church

Eidsbygda, Norway

According to a notice board outside the church, the nave and south porch of the Rødven Stave Church date from the 14th century, the crucifix dates from the 13th century and the pulpit from 1712. Inside are an ornately carved crucifix and pulpit. The church is a Møre-type stave church due to its structure and the exterior support posts that brace the walls. During an archeological survey in 1962-1963, marks were found from posts for an older building on the same location.

The church is no longer actively used and it has been owned by the Society for the Preservation of Norwegian Ancient Monuments since 1907, when a new Rødven Church was built next to this church building. Although it is a museum, it does have one worship service each year on Olsok, the eve of St. Olav's Day.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

odin hansen smedbak (9 months ago)
Church was what you would expect. Guide was really bad. Teenage girl that said about 5 sentences and then just started looking in other directions. After a solid 40-50 seconds of awkward silence we figured the guide part was done so we thanked her and that was it. . Not the best experience
yodos otra vez (10 months ago)
Nice
Clifford Kentros (2 years ago)
off the beaten track, but still near many of the things that you want to see. definitely worth a detour
xXPoohXx xXBearXx (3 years ago)
Beautiful little church, magical in the winter
Graham Cummings (3 years ago)
Very beautiful and peaceful place.
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