Rødven Stave Church

Eidsbygda, Norway

According to a notice board outside the church, the nave and south porch of the Rødven Stave Church date from the 14th century, the crucifix dates from the 13th century and the pulpit from 1712. Inside are an ornately carved crucifix and pulpit. The church is a Møre-type stave church due to its structure and the exterior support posts that brace the walls. During an archeological survey in 1962-1963, marks were found from posts for an older building on the same location.

The church is no longer actively used and it has been owned by the Society for the Preservation of Norwegian Ancient Monuments since 1907, when a new Rødven Church was built next to this church building. Although it is a museum, it does have one worship service each year on Olsok, the eve of St. Olav's Day.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hai Vu (2 years ago)
Do not come expecting grandeur, you will be disappointed. Come with an open mind and perhaps you'll find a little piece of history.
Magnus Mjelve (2 years ago)
Nice view
Raymond King (2 years ago)
What a lovely church and so full of history and wonder. The atmosphere for worship was strong and it was a privilege to visit and learn about stave churches. An excellent visit
Cees Homans (2 years ago)
Mooi kerkje. Goed voor tien minuten beschouwing.
Petra Perlick (2 years ago)
Eine Kirche aus dem 13.ten Jahrhundert. Wunderschön und faszinierend. Wenn man in der Gegend ist ...ein muss sie zu besuchen.
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