Kvernes Stave Church

Averøy, Norway

From ancient times Kvernes has been of great religious and cultural importance at Nordmøre. The excavation of a white phallus stone, a sacred symbol of fertility, supports this fact. The stave church was built around year 1300 and has a rather large main nave (16×7,5 m) with external diagonal props supporting the walls. Several repairs/reconstructions have been carried out. In 1633 the stave-built chancelwas torn down, and a new one erected in log construction. A baptistery was raised at the western end, windows were put in, and the chancel was decorated with painted scenes from the Bible. In the following decade, the nave and baptistery were decorated with acantus paintings. The vicar, Mr. Anders Ericsen (1603-62) paid all those expenses himself.

The king sold the church in 1725, and it was in private ownership until 1872 when it was bought by the parish. A new church was built in 1893, and the stave church was saved from demolition when Fortidsminneforeningen (The Society for the Preservation of Ancient Monuments) bought it in 1896.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

josep maria soler (2 years ago)
Antiquísima
Steve Landis (2 years ago)
Interesting. Good insight into the lives of those many generations ago.
Jo Lee (2 years ago)
The parking is located at the back of the church, which the access is about 100 meters away from the church, turn right onto Stavkirkevein, parking is at the end of the road. This stave church is unique, with about 5 supporting cross beams on each side. We didn't get to visit inside the church (closed since beginning of September), its exterior itself is beautiful and interesting enough for us, especially when compared to the modern white color church next to it.
HR Lu (2 years ago)
It was in a bureatiful setting. The Church itself was not open. The TripAdvisor gave a location that was 2 miles away from the actual site. Google map pointed toward it's exit only road.
Neil Forrest (3 years ago)
This is a wondrous building, much loved by its stewards, and host to the remarkable carving of the Northern Star. If you like magic, you will be transported by this building.
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