Tohmajärvi Church

Tohmajärvi, Finland

The wooden church of Tohmajärvi the oldest church in North Carelia. The church was built in 1756 and the bell tower couple of years later. The altarpiece is painted by Mikael Toppelius. The location on the small peninsula is one of the most beautiful church sites in Finland.

Other monuments in church grounds are a memorial to those who fell and were left behind in Carelia, (now Russian Republic of Karelia) and Bishop Eino Sormunen's gravestone and a memorial to the people of Tohmajärvi who died of hunger during 1865-68.

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Details

Founded: 1756
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

chao an (2 years ago)
Lovely church, with amazing lake view and graceful graveyard
Денис Димитров (2 years ago)
Очень красивое, ухоженное место
Sirpa Potkonen (2 years ago)
Kaunis puukirkko
Iida Putkonen (2 years ago)
Todella kaunis maisema ja hieno kirkko!
Jari Sundman (2 years ago)
Hyvin kaunis sekä siltä että ulkoa pieni kirkko hienossa ympäristössä .
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