The brick-made Joensuu Church was built in 1903 and designed by a Finnish church architect Josef Stenbäck. The church is in the Gothic Revival style, but it also has some features of Jugendstil. The high tower located in the southeast corner is the bell tower and in the lower southwest tower is the organ. It was built in 1969 by Organ Factory of Kangasala and has 36 stops. The church has 1000 seats. On the altar is a painting The Crucifixion of Jesus, made by Ilmari Launis in 1910.

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Address

Papinkatu 8, Joensuu, Finland
See all sites in Joensuu

Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jota Eme (2 years ago)
Beautiful church
Tatjana Sigorskaia (2 years ago)
Красивое место в центре города в ухоженном зелёном парке на берегу огромного озера Pielisjärvi- евангелическо-лютеранская церковь Йоенсуу. Построена была в 1903 году по неоготическому стилю. Красивые витражи, старинный орган. В церкви около 900 мест для сидения на службе. Церковь популярное место для посещений. Здесь часто проходят концерты органной музыки и других музыкальных инструментов, песенные фестивали знаменитых певцов классического исполнения.
Aitor Barbero (2 years ago)
A nice looking church
Yana Dotcenko (4 years ago)
Classic church.
Luis Puerto (5 years ago)
Beautiful lutheran church.
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