Iisalmi Old Church

Iisalmi, Finland

The parish of Iisalmi area was founded in 1627, and the parish church was built in the same year. Kustaa Aadolf Church, which was built in 1779, is not, however, the original one as two churches were previously built on the same site. The oldest artefacts in the church are the small 17th century chandeliers above the galleries. The other chandeliers were purchased later.

The paintings which decorate the galleries date from the 18th century. They were originally made for the second church on the site and moved to Kustaa Aadolf Church when it was built. The paintings on the side galleries portray the ten disciples of Jesus, and the pictures of the organ gallery represent various biblical scenes. The altarpiece was painted by Alexandra Såltin in 1886. It depicts the transfiguration of Christ.

In the 19th century the church was made plainer, and these paintings were covered due to pictures, as well as other decorations, being considered too worldly. The paintings were discovered and restored when renovations were carried out in 1927.

Reference: Parish of Iisalmi

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Details

Founded: 1779
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.iisalmenseurakunta.fi

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Kristiina Sneck (2 years ago)
A beautiful and atmospheric church, well served as a venue for a Christmas concert.
Juha Parviainen (3 years ago)
Beautiful old church.
Hannu Poutanen (3 years ago)
Exterior festive church. I didn't go inside.
Pirkko Kandelberg (3 years ago)
The church is being renovated for celebrations. Isohkp is surrounded by a cemetery.
Matti Okkonen (3 years ago)
An interesting destination. Good guidance provided even more important additional information.
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