The Mir (Mirsky) Castle Complex was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2000. Duke Yuri Ilyinich began construction of the castle near the village of Mir after the turn of the 16th century in the Gothic architectural style. Five towers surrounded the courtyard of the citadel, the walls of which formed a square of 75 meters on each side. In 1568, when the Ilyinich dynasty died out, the Mir Castle passed into the hands of Mikołaj Krzysztof 'the Orphan' Radziwiłł, who refitted it with a two-winged, three-story stately residence along the eastern and northern inner walls of the castle. Plastered facades were decorated with limestone portals, plates, balconies and porches in the Renaissance style.

In 1817, after the castle had been abandoned for nearly a century and had suffered severe damage in the Napoleonic wars, owner Dominik Hieronim Radziwiłł died of battle injuries and the castle passed to his daughter Stefania, who married Ludwig zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. Later the castle became a possession of their daughter Maria, who married Prince Chlodwig Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst.

Their son, Maurice Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, sold the castle to Nikolai Sviatopolk-Mirski, of the Bialynia clan, in 1895. Nikolaj's son Michail began to rebuild the castle according to the plans of architect Teodor Bursze. The Sviatopolk-Mirski family owned the castle until 1939, when the Soviet Union occupied eastern Poland.

When German forces invaded the Soviet Union in 1941 they occupied the castle and converted it to a ghetto for the local Jewish population, prior to their liquidation. Between 1944 and 1956, the castle was used as a housing facility, resulting in damage to the castle's interior.

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Founded: c. 1520
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belarus

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Siarhei Krukouski (8 months ago)
More than 500 years old huge and powerfull Noble castle with a collection of artifacts inside from the UNESCO heritage list with 3 ancient churches will impress you with amazing spirit of brave middle ages - the time of honest knights and incredible ladies.
Peter Mikhail (11 months ago)
A wonderful thing about Belarus management of such landmarks, is that they turn whole area into an open museum, with all its lakes, fields, trees and animals. The place is full of history, arts and beauty of both architecture and nature.
Aliaksei Kazliak (11 months ago)
Great place to see a piece of history, how it could look centuries ago. Highly recommended for visitors to stay at the hotel in the castle for at least one night - an unforgettable experience. The museum is also not bad, just take a guided tour, it's cheap but really worth it.
Jordan S (15 months ago)
I tried to walk every square inch of this awesome place
Vladislav Goman (17 months ago)
Nice and comfy place to get acquainted with Belarusian history. This castle is one of a plenty reconstructed and well saved ones in Belarus. The service is hospitable and responsive. It may take you up to 3-5 hours to discover this place. So it's definitely a must visit! Discover also Nesvizh castle that is not far away from that one. Do not forget to take a walkie outside the castle. Nature and the lake around that place are magnificent.
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