Halshany Castle

Halshany, Belarus

Halshany or Holszany Castle is the ruined residence of the Sapieha magnate family and was the seat of the one of the largest land estates in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Paweł Stefan Sapieha commissioned its construction and it was erected circa 1610 to replace the older castle, built by of the Holszanski princely family, of whom Sapiehas were descendants and heirs.

Also known as the Black Castle (although it is built of red brick), the residence formerly rivaled Mir Castle as the most elegant private château of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The name Black Castle in fact originally applies to a fictional building from a book by Uladzimir Karatkievich, which was loosely based on Halshany Castle.

The castle and the surrounding estates were devastated, robbed and looted, twice: by the invading Swedes troops during the Deluge and during the Great Northern War in 1704. Due to financial stress experienced by the Sapiehas in the wake of the Domestic War and ongoing Great Northern War, the castle had never been fully restored.

Later during the 18th century the castle with its estate diminished by creditors passed to the Żaba family, to be sold to the Korsak family with the estate further diminished by the creditors. The last Polish landlords. the Korsaks, sold, in the last quarter of the 19th century, the castle to a Russian landlord, Gorbanyov, who had the castles' towers pulled down in 1880, but in 1880s, according to the Geographical Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland, there were still 2 floors occupied with some of the wall paintings visible.

Currently, the castle continues to crumble away. An annual tournament is held near its walls each summer.

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Address

P95, Halshany, Belarus
See all sites in Halshany

Details

Founded: 1610
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belarus

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Анатолий Коробач (15 months ago)
Отличный памятник истории и архитектуры.
Darya Spevak (15 months ago)
Belarus one love
Сяржук Цярэшчанка (2 years ago)
Зараз адбываецца рэстаўрацыя замка, адноўлена адна вежа( выглядае прывабна) і частка прымыкаючай сцяны
Галка (2 years ago)
Красивое место. Ребята(подростки) интересно рассказывают о замке, рассказ заучен и вопросы вводят в ступор но и то что услышали было интересно и никто не торопил с осмотром ждали пока посмотрим и зафотофиксируем. Не пожалели что согласились их послушать.
Ирина Миклаш (2 years ago)
Сейчас в замке ведутся реставрационные работы, возможно, в скором времени мы сможем увидеть его настоящее величие. А пока - только руины, но и они впечатляют.
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