Medininkai Castle was built in the late 13th century or the first quarter of the 14th century. The defensive perimeter of the castle was 6.5 hectares; it is the largest enclosure type castle in Lithuania.

The castle was built on plain ground and was designed for flank defence. The rectangular castle's yard covered approximately 1.8 hectares and was protected by walls 15 metres high and 2 metres thick. The castle had 4 gates and towers. The main tower (donjon), about 30 metres high, was used for residential quarters. Medininkai was first mentioned in 1392. The castle was badly damaged by a major fire in the late 15th century. Because of increased use of firearms, this type of castle was no longer suited for defensive purposes and was later used as a residence. In 1655 during the war with Russia the castle was badly damaged and never reconstructed again. During the Second World War Germans set their gun arsenal in one of towers of Medininkai castle. The tower was burst when Germans retreated. The castle was not repaired until 1960. Only then slow reconstruction works were started, however, full reconstruction was not finished until now.

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Address

5213, Medininkai, Lithuania
See all sites in Medininkai

Details

Founded: 1392
Category: Castles and fortifications in Lithuania

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mindaugas Pilkauskas (41 days ago)
Wonderful historic place, better to visit in summer. Though, beautiful view im winter.
Дмитрий Саливон (3 months ago)
There is a high fence and a tower, in which is museum and you can climb to the roof to see surrounding. The cost is 4 euros for adults and 1.5 for permission to take photos. The parking is free. The place is nice, we spent 2 hours there.
Rokabra Noname (6 months ago)
Exhibitions on 1st and 2nd floor made greatest impression despite not very many original artifacts are disposed. Good infrastructure for disabled is installed inside, information is both in Lithuanian and English. We liked that all major castles of Lithuania are briefly introduced both in written and paintings. Entrance fee must be payed outside, permission for photographing is charged additionally. WC is in administration builiding. Well spent time.
Redas Šimelis (7 months ago)
Interesting place. New, fresh museum with interesting expo. Would suggest to take a guide if you are history maniac
A Z (9 months ago)
Once an important castle with their own rich picturesque history.. it was demolished and now it is being rebuilt. There is no row of bastions, high walls, deep moat or raised bridges.. just fantastic view from the top of main tower. Quiet and calm place.
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