Lida Castle was one of several citadels erected by Grand Duke Gediminas of Lithuania in the early 14th century to defend his lands against the expansion of the Teutonic Knights. Other links in this chain of defense included Hrodna, Navahrudak, Kreva, Medininkai, and Trakai. The modern town of Lida, Belarus grew up around this castle.

The site selected for the castle is naturally defended by the Kamenka and Lida rivers to east and west. Construction of boulder walls was carried out in 1323-1325. Later they were faced with red brick. The castle had two angle towers and a church, which was moved outside the walls in 1533. The upper storeys of both towers were lived in.

Despite its strong fortifications, Lida was taken by the Teutonic Knights on several occasions in 1384 and 1392. Lithuanian Grand Duke Vytautas gave it to his ally, Khan Tokhtamysh, who settled 'in a yurt near the castle'. In 1406, the family of Yury of Smolensk was locked up in Lida as hostages; his attempt to take the castle and liberate them was not successful. In 1433, Lida was a point of contention between Švitrigaila and his cousin Sigismund Kęstutaitis.

The following decades were somewhat less stormy. Lida was ravaged by the Crimean Tatars in 1506 and it was stormed by the Russians during the Russo-Polish War in 1659. The Swedes, taking it twice during the Great Northern War, had both towers blown up. In 1794, the castle grounds were the site of a battle between Kościuszko's followers and the Russians.

After the city fire of 1891, the south-western tower and parts of the western wall of the castle were torn down to provide stone for repairing fire-damaged houses. A team of archaeologists from St. Petersburg intervened to halt vandalism. There was only a slight restoration of the walls in the 1920s.

During much of the 20th century, an itinerant zoo or circus occupied the castle compound. Every December a Christmas tree was placed within the walls. It was not until 1982 that a restoration campaign was launched. The red brick was used to denote the newly reconstructed sections (up to 12 meters in height). Significant restoration was held in 2010.

Each year, the Lida Castle hosts a medieval-style tournament. A museum is being created within its towers.

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Address

ul. Zamkovaja, Lida, Belarus
See all sites in Lida

Details

Founded: 1323
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belarus

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stanislav Gurniak (11 months ago)
A typical defensive castle was built in Romanesque architecture by Gediminas, Grand Duke of Lithuania. The location was well chosen - the swampy lowland of the confluence of the rivers Kamenka (almost disappeared nowadays) and Lideia. Despite looking unbreakable for medieval times, this castle had been sieged many times. It was restored and looks good nowadays. In summer the castle traditionally hosts theatrical performances and medieval tournaments.
Elizaveta Cherepanova (11 months ago)
This castle looks interesting. Does not look like castles l get used to see in movies and books. Still it is worth visiting. Not really huge, however conveys the Mediterranean atmosphere.
Oleh Lototskyy (15 months ago)
It's good to visit if around the area
hjk kjh (2 years ago)
Interesting castle and good exhibition.
Edgar Lautsyus (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle that has been reconstructed. Nice park surrounding it and a place to have diner.
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