Archangel Michael's Cathedral

Mozyr, Belarus

The Archangel Michael's Cathedral is a Belarusian orthodox cathedral church of the Eparchy of Turov located in Mozyr. The church was built in 18th century as a Catholic church of Franciscan monastery in late baroque style in the form of two-towered three-nave basilica.

In 1745 Marszałek Kazimierz Oskierka start the building of new stone Franciscan (in Poland called 'Bernardine') monastery with a big church in its center.

After partitions of Poland Mozyr was in Russian Empire. After January Uprising (1863–64) quite all catholic monasteries and many churches in modern Belarus and Ukraine were closed, so in 1864 Mozyr franciscan church was transferred to the orthodox church.

From 1937 to 1941 the cathedral was turned into a prison of the NKVD of Polesie region.

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Details

Founded: 1745
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Handoga Line (7 months ago)
I advise everyone to visit this cathedral with a rich history. We went there on a separate excursion in the basement and even in the bell tower. I liked everything very much.
Татьяна Беленкова (11 months ago)
There is Grace ...
Jean Lekant (12 months ago)
Initially, this is a Bernardine church and monastery, which is very clearly visible from the architecture. Nevertheless, the Orthodox Church has well restored and preserved the temple.
Павел Семенов (16 months ago)
Historical and memorable place of our city. She survived both the tsarist era and the communists and is still standing.
Pavel (16 months ago)
Historical and memorable place of our city. She survived both the tsarist era and the communists and is still standing.
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