Orthodox Church Museum

Kuopio, Finland

The Orthodox Church Museum, established in Kuopio in 1957, derives from the Collection of Ancient Objects founded at the Monastery of Valamo in 1911. Most of the exhibits, which consist mainly of icons, sacred objects and liturgical textiles, are from the monasteries and congregations of Karelia: a region in southeast Finland that was partially ceded to the Soviet Union in connection with the Second World War. Objects in the museum are mainly from the 18th and 19th centuries.

In addition to the permanent exhibitions, the museum offers yearly seasonal exhibitions. These theme-based exhibitions are aimed to introduce the variety of ecclesiastical art of eastern Christian Church. The virtual exhibition is built in accordance to the physical frames of the museum building: icons and sacred objects are displayed upstairs, liturgical textiles downstairs.

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Address

Karjalankatu 1, Kuopio, Finland
See all sites in Kuopio

Details

Founded: 1957
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mykhailo Syvorig (2 years ago)
Also history.
AJ Wellcop (2 years ago)
Really interesting. Beautiful icons and great insights into Finnish history
Tero Ronkko (Dinokkio) (2 years ago)
Must see museum in kuopio!
Nic Riosa (3 years ago)
Missed the tour but was a nice place
Rolls John (3 years ago)
Antiquity guaranteed with relics/ crafts. Church is famous among the orthodox congregation.
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