Orthodox Church Museum

Kuopio, Finland

The Orthodox Church Museum, established in Kuopio in 1957, derives from the Collection of Ancient Objects founded at the Monastery of Valamo in 1911. Most of the exhibits, which consist mainly of icons, sacred objects and liturgical textiles, are from the monasteries and congregations of Karelia: a region in southeast Finland that was partially ceded to the Soviet Union in connection with the Second World War. Objects in the museum are mainly from the 18th and 19th centuries.

In addition to the permanent exhibitions, the museum offers yearly seasonal exhibitions. These theme-based exhibitions are aimed to introduce the variety of ecclesiastical art of eastern Christian Church. The virtual exhibition is built in accordance to the physical frames of the museum building: icons and sacred objects are displayed upstairs, liturgical textiles downstairs.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Karjalankatu 1, Kuopio, Finland
See all sites in Kuopio

Details

Founded: 1957
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carey Jääskeläinen (2 years ago)
Interesting place, nicely laid out. A little expencive though
Taina Tynjälä (2 years ago)
Paljon nähtävää. Ota aikaa niin ehdit lukea esineiden historian ja merkityksen
Kari Kangas (2 years ago)
Mikäli ikonit ja/tai muut kirkollisiin (ortodoksisiin) toimituksiin liittyvät esineet kiinnostavat, niin Riisassa käynti on ehdottoman kannattavaa. Museon kokoelmat ovat laajat, osa esineistöstä on satoja vuosia vanhaa ja esillepanokin on tehty huolella. Miinuksena ovat kovin pienellä tekstillä kirjoitetut ja hämärähkössä tilassa vaikeanlaisesti luettavissa olevat taustaselostukset, jotka kiinnostavuudeltaan olisivat huippuluokkaa. Suullista opastusta jäi kaipaamaan, sitä on saatavissa vain ryhmille. Infossa on erittäin ystävällinen ja auttamishaluinen palvelu. Parkkipaikkojakin löytyy - ne erityisluvalla käytettävissä olevat ovat museovieraiden käytettävissä kunhan vain hakee infosta pysäköintilapun.
albrusgher unknown (3 years ago)
Really valuable for those interested in the history and religious feelings of the country on the last centuries.
Pertti Malkki (3 years ago)
Unique exibition, very professional guides. A must do when you visit wonderful Kuopio.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Klis Fortress

From its origin as a small stronghold built by the ancient Illyrian tribe Dalmatae, becoming a royal castle that was the seat of many Croatian kings, to its final development as a large fortress during the Ottoman wars in Europe, Klis Fortress has guarded the frontier, being lost and re-conquered several times. Due to its location on a pass that separates the mountains Mosor and Kozjak, the fortress served as a major source of defense in Dalmatia, especially against the Ottoman advance, and has been a key crossroad between the Mediterranean belt and the Balkan rear.

Since Duke Mislav of the Duchy of Croatia made Klis Fortress the seat of his throne in the middle of the 9th century, the fortress served as the seat of many Croatia"s rulers. The reign of his successor, Duke Trpimir I, the founder of the Croatian royal House of Trpimirović, is significant for spreading Christianity in the Duchy of Croatia. He largely expanded the Klis Fortress, and in Rižinice, in the valley under the fortress, he built a church and the first Benedictine monastery in Croatia. During the reign of the first Croatian king, Tomislav, Klis and Biograd na Moru were his chief residences.

In March 1242 at Klis Fortress, Tatars who were a constituent segment of the Mongol army under the leadership of Kadan suffered a major defeat while in pursuit of the Hungarian army led by King Béla IV. After their defeat by Croatian forces, the Mongols retreated, and Béla IV rewarded many Croatian towns and nobles with 'substantial riches'. During the Late Middle Ages, the fortress was governed by Croatian nobility, amongst whom Paul I Šubić of Bribir was the most significant. During his reign, the House of Šubić controlled most of modern-day Croatia and Bosnia. Excluding the brief possession by the forces of Bosnian King, Tvrtko I, the fortress remained in Hungaro-Croatian hands for the next several hundred years, until the 16th century.

Klis Fortress is probably best known for its defense against the Ottoman invasion of Europe in the early 16th century. Croatian captain Petar Kružić led the defense of the fortress against a Turkish invasion and siege that lasted for more than two and a half decades. During this defense, as Kružić and his soldiers fought without allies against the Turks, the military faction of Uskoks was formed, which later became famous as an elite Croatian militant sect. Ultimately, the defenders were defeated and the fortress was occupied by the Ottomans in 1537. After more than a century under Ottoman rule, in 1669, Klis Fortress was besieged and seized by the Republic of Venice, thus moving the border between Christian and Muslim Europe further east and helping to contribute to the decline of the Ottoman Empire. The Venetians restored and enlarged the fortress, but it was taken by the Austrians after Napoleon extinguished the republic itself in 1797. Today, Klis Fortress contains a museum where visitors to this historic military structure can see an array of arms, armor, and traditional uniforms.