The Martinikerk (Martin's church) is the oldest church in Groningen. The church and its associated tower (the Martinitoren) are named after Saint Martin of Tours (316–397), the patron saint of the Bishopric of Utrecht to which Groningen belonged. The church was a cathedral for a short period during the first bishopric of Groningen (1559–1594).

The origins of the Martinikerk are a cruciform church built in the 13th century, which was extended in the 15th and 16th centuries. It contains several 16th century tombs and Wessel Gansfort's 18th century tomb. Much of the wall and roof paintwork has been preserved. Of particular note is a 16th-century depiction of the life of Jesus Christ.

The tower was built from 1469 till 1482, with later additions. Citizens of Groningen often refer to the tower as d'Olle Grieze (Old Grey One). The original 13th century tower was destroyed by lightning and a new tower was built in the 15th century, also destroyed by lightning.

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Since I can’t be there, maybe someone would be interested in taking a video of where the Organ is situated; then kindly uploading it to YouTube, for instance.


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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

B L (2 years ago)
Beautiful architecture
Elaine Morgan (3 years ago)
Very peaceful place. Nice familiar service.
Arne Janse van Rensburg (4 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral, has perhaps the finest baroque organ in the world!
Akshatha Vydula (4 years ago)
The movie up the tower is really good. Shows the history of the city. The downside is that you've to pay at the cafe backdoor to even go inside the church, let alone be the tower. Church should be open for people, without any entry payment.
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