Kinsarvik Church

Kinsarvik, Norway

Kinsarvik Church is the oldest stone church in the whole Hardanger region, and at one time, it was one of the four main churches for all of Hordaland county. The present church seats about 240 people.

The first wooden church in all of Hardanger was built on this site around the year 1050. It was most likely a wooden church which was replaced by the present stone church around the year 1160. Remains of the previous church have been found under the present church. The foundation walls were built about 1.5 metres wide. Archaeological investigations have found that there was a fire in the church, likely around the year 1180. This was around the time when the Birkebeiners ravaged Hordaland county as they were fighting for power.

The church was originally built without a choir, and the choir was built after the fire, probably in the early 1200s. High up on the west gable is window opening leading into the church attic. It is probably here they have hoisted the local ship sails and masts to store during the winters.

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Founded: 1160
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rudi Brochs (4 years ago)
Western Norway from its best. Highly recommend Hardanger.
Beata Maria Beck (5 years ago)
Weri old interesting church
Olia (5 years ago)
Quite a beautiful ancient church, has its own atmosphere. The interesting murals inside are interesting, albeit somewhat erased. There is a functioning cemetery near the church. It is fashionable to go inside and look at any time
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