Ullensvang Church

Ullensvang, Norway

Ullensvang Church was built in the 13th century and has been remodeled and expanded several times over the centuries. The present church seats about 430 people. Colloquially, the church is known as the Hardanger Cathedral due to its size, history, and central location in the Hardanger region of the county.

The area of Ullensvang is named after the old pagan god Ullin. Ullensvang is thus an old name. It is reasonable that Ullensvang had religious gathering place before the time of Christianity in Norway. When Christianity came to the area, it is likely that a church was built here where the old temple had stood. Ullensvang Church is first recorded in historical records in 1309, so it is likely that the stone church was built between the years 1250-1300. Legend has it that the church was built by people from Scotland. Originally, the church had no tower, but the current tower was built between 1883 and 1885 during an expansion and renovation led by the architect Christian Christie.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yuko Yabe (4 years ago)
Patrick Wauters (4 years ago)
Leuke stop met de camper. Mogelijkheid tot zwemmen achter de kerk.
Rob van Zoelen (5 years ago)
Very old (from araund 1250) church with an interesting history. churches in Norway usually arent made of stone. Also great surroundings
Irina Thorsen (6 years ago)
God jul!
Anusorn Rojkittikhun (6 years ago)
บรรยากาศรอบๆโบสถ์ และหมู่บ้านแถวๆนั้นสวยงาม น่ารักดีครับ
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